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Here is the original regex

/^([A-Za-z0-9_\-\.])+\@([A-Za-z0-9_\-\.])+\.([A-Za-z]{2,4})$/

This will validate email properly but if I type @test.com it was also allowed. I added {1}

/^([A-Za-z0-9_\-\.]{1})+\@([A-Za-z0-9_\-\.])+\.([A-Za-z]{2,4})$/

I tested this in gskinner.com and working fine. It will not allow @test.com.

But in my site, it still not working. it will still allow @test.com

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marked as duplicate by Matthew Strawbridge, T.J. Crowder, tjameson, Pointy, MikeM Apr 21 '13 at 17:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
See here: stackoverflow.com/questions/201323/… –  Michael W Apr 21 '13 at 16:18
1  
Why do you put your + outside of the capture group? This seems like you'll have problems actually capturing the pieces. –  tjameson Apr 21 '13 at 16:18
1  
from: net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/other/… /^([a-z0-9_\.-]+)@([\da-z\.-]+)\.([a-z\.]{2,6})$/ –  charly Apr 21 '13 at 16:19
    
"It will not allow @test.com...But in my site, it still not working. it will still allow @test.com." Well, it's going to be impossible to help you without seeing how you're (mis)applying the pattern on your site, since you say the pattern works when not used on your site. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 21 '13 at 16:20
3  
This has been asked and answered before. See this answer for why you can't do this with a JavaScript regular expression, and this answer for a version a lot of people would probably use that works in the simple case but fails in some valid cases (for the reasons in the first link). –  T.J. Crowder Apr 21 '13 at 16:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So, it looks like you've got some issues with your regex.

/^([A-Za-z0-9_\-\.])+\@([A-Za-z0-9_\-\.])+\.([A-Za-z]{2,4})$/

The plus after the first group should be within the parentheses and that plus is actually what you want to be able to reject the case of "@test.com" In regex the + means that the pattern must match one or more characters, but since it's not in your capturing group ([A-Za-z0-9_-.]) it's not reflecting that.

Your proposed "fix" with the addition of the {1} implies that your first group should only match subgroups with a length of one, and as such it will error if you ever try to re-use this pattern in slightly different cases.

Move the plus within the parens in your first bit of code and you should be fine.

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@Jorge. This answer is incorrect. Neither of the OP's regex will match @test.com, and ([A-Za-z0-9_\-\.])+ and ([A-Za-z0-9_\-\.]+) are equivalent in terms of what they match (but not in what is captured). –  MikeM Apr 21 '13 at 17:38

Google's regex for validating emails will cover 99% of use cases:

/**
 * Checks if the provided string is a valid address spec (local@domain.com).
 * @param {string} str The email address to check.
 * @return {boolean} Whether the provided string is a valid address spec.
 */
goog.format.EmailAddress.isValidAddrSpec = function(str) {
  // This is a fairly naive implementation, but it covers 99% of use cases.
  // For more details, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Email_address#Syntax
  // TODO(mariakhomenko): we should also be handling i18n domain names as per
  // http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internationalized_domain_name
  var filter =
      /^[+a-zA-Z0-9_.!#$%&'*\/=?^`{|}~-]+@([a-zA-Z0-9-]+\.)+[a-zA-Z0-9]{2,6}$/;
  return filter.test(str);
};

From goog.format.EmailAddress class of Google's closure library.

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