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I'm trying to optimize a binary reader for the Stata filetype, and the current implementation is lazily evaluated for each record in the file. The reader loses speed very quickly as the size of the file increases.

When I asked the person who initially wrote it why he used a generator, he said it to be memory-careful. What advice I've been given is read and process larger chunks of the file at a time, and I would like to know how to tell what the largest chunk I can read without going into virtual memory is.

A few side notes

  • why is reading and processing large chunks faster than doing so with small chunks. Does the cost of overhead being called many times add up that quickly?
  • I'm interested in seeing if I can get even greater speed gains by trying my hand at Cython. Does anyone know of any modules with binary file readers I could take a look at (other than the scipy.stats matlab file reader)?
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1 Answer 1

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  • I would like to know how to tell what the largest chunk I can read without going into virtual memory is.

I'm not sure what you mean by "without going into virtual memory", but this is highly dependent on details such as the file format, the storage medium and the filesystem/OS. It's best determined empirically. If you can, implement a parameter chunk_size (or n_records, or whatever) that determines how many records to read at a time.

  • why is reading and processing large chunks faster than doing so with small chunks

Depends on the code that's doing the reading. It might be due to system call overhead, or because Python code has to executed in between reads.

  • Does anyone know of any modules with binary file readers I could take a look

I co-wrote a loader for the LibSVM/SVMlight file format, a simple text format for sparse matrices, in Cython. It's distributed as part of scikit-learn.

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