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It is quite common "good practice" to make local variables final by default. Don't know about eclipse, but in IDEA there is even a checkbox in "create local variable" dialog. But there is one issue that doesn't let me use it every time. Take this code for example:

...
final Foo foo = null;
try{
    foo = getFromSomewhere();
} catch (IDontCareException e) {
    log.info(e, "looks like foo is not there);
}

if (foo != null) {
    doSomethingWithFoo(foo);
}

doSomethingElse();
...

The issue is that IDontCareException does not extend RuntimeException... Is there any way to use final variable still?

share|improve this question
    
Just to make sure I understand: your IDE is telling you that you can't mark IDontCareException e as final because IDontCareException does not extend RuntimeException? –  sigpwned Apr 21 '13 at 17:25
    
No, sorry for not explaining it right. I want foo to be final. –  yevgeniy mordovkin Apr 21 '13 at 17:26
1  
foo can't be final because you are setting it to null, and then trying to reassign it. You use the keyword final for when something is constant, which in your case it clearly isn't. –  Supericy Apr 21 '13 at 17:29
6  
Well, then don't make it final. The code is still correct. I personally disagree with it being a good practice. It clutters the code with final keywords everywhere, and if methods are short as they should be, making the variables final doesn't add anything, IMHO, but reduces readability and increases verbosity. –  JB Nizet Apr 21 '13 at 17:30
1  
@J-unior: because it doesn't really answer your question. You asked for a construct that lets you use the final keyword, and my comment doesn't tell you how. Only that I wouldn't care about using it (and why). –  JB Nizet Apr 22 '13 at 7:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

yes. write a helper method:

private Foo getFooOrNull() {
   try {
     return getFromSomewhere();
   } catch (Exception e) { return null;}
}

and then in your class:

private final Foo myFoo = getFooOrNull();

this will move the try/catch block out of the way and improve code readability, in addition to allowing yuo to keep you field final.

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Leaving in the null is not helpful. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 21 '13 at 17:39
    
true, but you still need to know if you have a foo or not later on. the other alternative might be a mock Foo that does nothing, but thats a bit more complicated. –  radai Apr 21 '13 at 17:40

The definition of final is that you can't change what it references to. With foo = getFromSomewhere() you do exactly that. You can't do that. One option is to have it all in the try-block, as such:

try{
    final Foo foo = getFromSomewhere();
    doSomethingWithFoo(foo); //If getFromSomewhere() always returns a non-null value, otherwise you will still need the null-check
} catch (IDontCareException e) {
    log.info(e, "looks like foo is not there);
}

doSomethingElse();
...
share|improve this answer
    
that forces the field initialization and usage to be in the same place. if the field really is for one-time-use like this it can be made a local variable –  radai Apr 21 '13 at 17:36

try

final Foo foo;
try{
    foo = getFromSomewhere();
} catch (IDontCareException e) {
    log.info(e, "looks like foo is not there);
    foo = null;
}

if (foo != null) {
    doSomethingWithFoo(foo);
}

EDIT: it doesn't compile. try this

Foo tmp;
try{
    tmp = getFromSomewhere();
} catch (IDontCareException e) {
    log.info(e, "looks like foo is not there);
    tmp = null;
}
final Foo foo = tmp;

if (foo != null) {
    doSomethingWithFoo(foo);
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Doesn't it give a compilation error? –  NINCOMPOOP Apr 21 '13 at 17:33
    
Indeed it doesn't compile ^^ –  mki Apr 21 '13 at 17:42
    
well the compiler isn't as smart as I thought:) –  bayou.io Apr 21 '13 at 17:43
1  
ok this good, but when I see this code, I am really convinced that adding final is bad :) –  mki Apr 21 '13 at 17:48

A practice is good if it improves your code in a way or other. Adding final to all your variable without thinking is certainly not a good practice. By the way local variable are already scoped in a method and most of the time have a very short life. Why making them final ? Is it again a sort of micro optimisation ? Honestly you gain nothing with that. And you make your code less readable.

final indicates that your variable is constant, it is not the case here since you reassign your variable.
For me the good answer here is : don't make this variable final !

share|improve this answer

You could try for example:

private void myMethod(){
   try{
      final Foo foo = getFromSomewhere();
      if(foo != null){
         doSomethingWithFoo(foo);
      }
  } catch (IDontCareException e) {
   log.info(e, "looks like foo is not there);
  }
  doSomethingElse();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why vote then downvote, then vote etc.. –  Mik378 Apr 21 '13 at 17:39
    
I assume getFromSomewhere is not going to return null. If it does, perhaps should be renamed to something like maybeGetSomewhereOrNot, or more likely rewrite it. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 21 '13 at 17:43
    
@Tom Hawtin - tackline That is a simple assumption, a lot of developers never care about this "naming" convention, although I agree with you. Thus, for this simple example, that is not focus on null-type checking, and without explicit getFromSomewhere()source code, checking for nullity isn't so stupid. –  Mik378 Apr 21 '13 at 17:49

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