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What is going wrong with this... can an xor's effect be reversed?

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The beauty of XOR and NOT is that they reverse themselves: !(!false) = false :) –  Skurmedel Apr 21 '13 at 18:39
    
xor is a simple function. a xor b xor b == a. it undoes itself. –  Marc B Apr 21 '13 at 18:39
    
ok, so pop rather than push, just not twice so (not not eax), xor you just xor again (simple when you think about it)... but with mov do you simply mov the other way round? –  user2283597 Apr 21 '13 at 18:44
    
tried the multiple xor and the double not, but 'not not' gives an error and won't "a xor b xor b" corrupt b so that b is zero? –  user2283597 Apr 21 '13 at 18:48
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I left your function as it was but simplified the decryption:

unsigned int encrypt(unsigned int input, unsigned int key)
{
    _asm
    {
        mov ecx, input
        mov eax, key
        push ecx                      ; preserves the value of the encrypted character by pushing it on the stack, the stack pointer decrements by 4 to allow this
        not eax                       ; completes the ones' complement on the Ekey, toggling the bits
        mov edx,eax                   ; copies the current value of the Ekey register and places it in edx, for holding
        pop eax                       ; restores original register value from stack
        xor eax,edx                   ; completes a bitwise exclusive or on the Ekey, with the previous value of the Ekey that was stored in edx
        ror al,1                      ; rotates the last 8 bits of the Ekey bitwise by 1 bit, as 1 mod 8 = 1
        ror al,1                      ; rotates al bitwise by 1 bit, as 1 mod 8 = 1
        not eax                       ; completes the ones' complement on the Ekey value, 'flipping' eax entirely   
    }
}

unsigned int decrypt(unsigned int input, unsigned int key)
{
    _asm
    {
        mov eax, input 
        not eax
        rol al,1
        rol al,1
        mov edx, key
        not edx
        xor eax, edx
    }
}

int main()
{
    unsigned int data = 0xB84A35F2;
    unsigned int encrypted  = 0;
    unsigned int decrypted = 0;
    unsigned int key = 0x3DB76E8C2;

    encrypted = encrypt(data, key);
    decrypted = decrypt(encrypted, key);
    std::cout << "Original Data: " << data << "\nEncrypted Data: " << encrypted << "\nDecrypted Data: " << decrypted << "\n";
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}
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I have tried importing your code into my program but when I input my variables it gives an error. Can i ask what key and input are, in relation to my initial code? Thanks –  user2283597 Apr 21 '13 at 20:44
    
I'm not sure exactly how you're planning to use your code. My intent was to show how to execute the reverse operation - which was what you asked. The functions as written work on integers not character arrays and simply encrypt and decrypt an integer. The key being passed in is the encryption key (I think you called it Ekey). The input is the integer to be en/de-crypted. –  Peter R Apr 21 '13 at 20:52
    
ok, I have added more to my original question to show some more of the code, to help explain it slightly better. When I try your method I get an output but it is very different to the original one, In addition, I would like to add that in my original function eax is the Ekey and ecx is the char that is altered. In the decrypt, would I need to therefore use ecx? –  user2283597 Apr 22 '13 at 17:11
    
thanks for the extensive amount of help you have provided, but i have also added to my original encryption to give more info to you... –  user2283597 Apr 22 '13 at 18:59
    
@0xC0000022L I have seen that you have helped on a similar issue... is there something I am missing with the decryption? –  user2283597 Apr 23 '13 at 14:26
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The obvious sequence would be something like:

; inputs:
;     edx: ekey
;     eax: "encrypted" word
; 
not eax
rol al, 1
rol al, 1
not edx
xor eax, edx

It also looks to me like the original code is unnecessarily complex. I think I'd write something more like this:

not eax
xchg eax, ecx
xor eax, ecx
rol al, 1
rol al, 1
not eax

I think more simplification may be possible as well, but I'll have to think about it to be sure.

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thanks, I didn't mention but the original was meant to be unoptimised and slightly long winded so to speak. Thanks though, I haven't used xchg before. –  user2283597 Apr 21 '13 at 20:01
    
I have added more to my original question to show some more of the code, to help explain it slightly better, I am using ecx as the char that is altered and eax holds the Ekey. Thanks –  user2283597 Apr 22 '13 at 17:12
    
thanks for the help, but some clarification is needed, and I have added more code to my original encryption to clarify and help with the reversal system. –  user2283597 Apr 22 '13 at 18:58
    
@user2283597: still almost entirely a matter of walking through the code backwards, and un-doing each transformation in order (e.g., the final add eax, 0x20 in the edited code becomes sub eax, 0x20 in the "decryptor" (and since it's last in the encryption, it'll be first in the decryption). –  Jerry Coffin Apr 22 '13 at 19:18
    
thanks, I have done the decryption using this method... I have edited my question to show my attempt... it is not decrypting properly though, so I'm just wondering which step I've messed up on. Thanks a bundle –  user2283597 Apr 22 '13 at 19:24
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