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I'm trying to validate a mobile number, below is what I have done so far but it does not appear to work.

I need it to rise a validation error when the value passed does not look like a mobile number. Mobile numbers can be 10 to 14 digits long start with 0 or 7 and could have 44 or +44 added to them.

def validate_mobile(value):
    """ Raise a ValidationError if the value looks like a mobile telephone number.
    """
    rule = re.compile(r'/^[0-9]{10,14}$/')

    if not rule.search(value):
        msg = u"Invalid mobile number."
        raise ValidationError(msg)
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have a look at this example: anthoniraj.com/python-code-for-mobile-number-validation –  Johnny Apr 21 '13 at 19:09
    
Could you provide some examples, which are valid, please? –  Alexey Apr 21 '13 at 19:10
    
@ Alexey Are the answers not valid? They appear to work. could you explain, it would really help if I have misunderstood. thanks –  GrantU Apr 21 '13 at 19:21
    
@User7 the answers treat your question differently. Currently the answer from MikeM is more graceful and more exact to your description. –  Alexey Apr 21 '13 at 19:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following regex matches your description

r'^(?:\+?44)?[07]\d{9,13}$'
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1  
To make it clear, I am not claiming that this is a good mobile phone validation regex, but just that it fits the definition of mobile numbers in the question. –  MikeM Apr 21 '13 at 20:35

These won't validate +44 numbers as required. Follow update: John Brown's link and try something like this:

def validate_not_mobile(value):

    rule = re.compile(r'(^[+0-9]{1,3})*([0-9]{10,11}$)')

    if rule.search(value):
        msg = u"You cannot add mobile numbers."
        raise ValidationError(msg)
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Perfect thank you. –  GrantU Apr 21 '13 at 20:17
1  
@User7. Perfect? The above will validate e.g gobbledegook999999999999999999999999999999. –  MikeM Apr 21 '13 at 20:29
1  
@User7 MikeM is correct, my bad. Please see his answer. MikeM, chill thanks for pointing out the error, but don't take offence we are are here for the same thing. –  Glyn Jackson Apr 21 '13 at 20:34

I would try something like:

re.compile(r'^\+?(44)?(0|7)\d{9,13}$')

You would want to first remove any spaces, hyphens, or parentheses though.

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I'd replace (0|7) with [07] as MikeM did. Also it would match phones like +0123456789 and +7123456789. –  Alexey Apr 21 '13 at 19:57

I would recommend to use the phonenumbers package which is a python port of Google's libphonenumber which includes a data set of mobile carriers now:

import phonenumbers
from phonenumbers import carrier
from phonenumbers.phonenumberutil import number_type

number = "+49 176 1234 5678"
carrier._is_mobile(number_type(phonenumbers.parse(number)))

This will return True in case number is a mobile number or False otherwise. Note that the number must be a valid international number or an exception will be thrown. You can also use phonenumbers to parse phonenumber given a region hint.

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