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Found this code

Here's the gyst:

ViewModel:

[ExtendWith(typeof(ValidationTemplate))]
public class PersonViewModel :INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public string GivenNames { get; set; }
    public string FamilyName { get; set; }

    public string FullName
    {
        get
        {

            return string.Format("{0} {1}", GivenNames, FamilyName);
        }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
}

ExtendWithAttribute

public class ExtendWithAttribute : Attribute
{
    public ExtendWithAttribute(Type type)
    {
    }
}

ValidationTemplate

public class ValidationTemplate : IDataErrorInfo
{
    private INotifyPropertyChanged target;

    public object Target
    {
        get
        {
            return target;
        }
        set
        {
            target = (INotifyPropertyChanged)value;
            validator = ValidationFactory.GetValidator(target.GetType());
            validationResult = validator.Validate(Target);
            target.PropertyChanged += Validate;
        }
    }

    private void Validate(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (validator != null)
        {
            validationResult = validator.Validate(target);
        }
    }

    private IValidator validator;
    private ValidationResult validationResult;

    public string Error
    {
        get
        {
            return string.Join(Environment.NewLine, validationResult.Errors.Select(x => x.ErrorMessage).ToArray());
        }
    }

    public string this[string propertyName]
    {
        get
        {
            return string.Join(Environment.NewLine, validationResult.Errors.Where(x => x.PropertyName == propertyName).Select(x => x.ErrorMessage).ToArray());
        }
    }
}

If we make an instance of PersonViewModel, we get:

  1. ValidationTemplate instantiated - I assume because we passed in the type into this ExtendWith attribute .NET automatically instantiates the type, but I can't find any info anywhere that confirms this behavior

  2. ValidationTemplate Target property is being invoked "magically" and it receives reference to the PersonViewModel. Which .NET behavior piece calls into this? I can't find any documentation that describes this behavior - seems like it relies on naming convention? Is there are other properties that can get populated? What wizardry is this :)

  3. If this object is bound in XAML the validation just works, but ViewModel doesn't directly implement IDataErrorInfo, which is what WPF hooks into to get it's validation working. Yet it works, somehow it's able to use this ValidationTemplate arbitrary object from somewhere.

Update: So after I examined the PersonViewModel in debugger the following yield interesting answers:

var viewModel = new PersonViewModel();
var isDataErrorInfo = viewModel is IDataErrorInfo; // true
var isDataErrorInfo = viewModel is ValidationTemplate; // false

The code is based on Caliburn.Micro, bootstrapper is vanilla with nothing in it. I instantiated PersonViewModel by hand to confirm that it's not WPF specific behavior that calls into the extender class, and I did get setters/getters on Target property firing.

Can someone please explain all these strange behaviors. I have a feeling this is some internal/undocumented features/hacks of .NET framework.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The project relies on Hereder. Took me all day of looking everywhere until I check csproj and saw post build tasks. Now it makes sense.

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There is no magic going on here. Attributes are a well documented feature in .NET. An attribute is essentially some extra information about a class that you can add that is accessed via reflection. You can read more about it here.

Well written MVVM code usually looks a lot like "magic." In actuality there is usually a well written framework that uses reflection and other tricks to automatically wire this up. Most likely a lot of the actual work to do all of this is in the Caliburn.Micro.dll or the FluentValidation.dll. That way you can write the bootstrap logic one time and just reuse it on all of your WPF/Silverlight/etc. projects. Unless you have the code for those as well you could use a reflector tool like the ones suggested here to look into them or just talk to the owner of the GitHub repo to see if you can get access to those as well.

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The documentation for attribute is something I've looked through extensively and know how this works. At this point I'm convinced this is an internal feature of .NET framework and not anything with caliburn/fluent as I've eliminated those variables by simplifying the case into a new project. This is diffirent, the activation of the type specified in the attribute parameter is done internally by .net framework as well as it being "blended" with the main class, aka, PersonViewModel is being extended by the code in ValidationTemplate. I'm looking for material that documents this behavior –  macsux Apr 22 '13 at 0:12

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