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Suppose that I have an abstract base class Parent and subclasses Child1 and Child2. If I have a function that takes a Parent*, is there a way (perhaps with RTTI?) to determine at runtime whether it's a Child1* or a Child2* that the function actually received?

My experience with RTTI here, so far, has been that when foo is a Parent*, typeid(foo) returns typeid(Parent*) regardless of the child class that foo's a member of.

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A Parent* is always a Parent*. It is never a Child*. What you mean to ask is "what is the type of the thing it points to". –  Kerrek SB Apr 21 '13 at 21:17
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I'm accepting Ernest Friedman-Hill's answer, but I want to make it clear that I'm very grateful to H2CO3 and Mosquito as well -- if I could accept all three answers, I certainly would, and be sure that I'm saving this page for future reference! –  ExOttoyuhr Apr 21 '13 at 21:21
    
Kerrek SB: I gave you the cold shoulder yesterday, but when I got around to the actual programming, your comment was probably more valuable than anything else on the page. Sorry about that... –  ExOttoyuhr Apr 23 '13 at 0:21
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to look at the typeid of the dereferenced pointer, not the pointer itself; I.e., typeid(*foo), not typeid(foo). Asking about the dereferenced pointer will get you the dynamic type; asking about the pointer itself will just get you the static type, as you observe.

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That sounds like a more exact fit with what I'd been looking for than creating numerous subclass pointers would've been... –  ExOttoyuhr Apr 21 '13 at 21:15
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You can use std::dynamic_cast for this.

Parent* ptr = new Child1();
if(dynamic_cast<Child1*>(ptr) != nullptr) {
    // ptr is object of Child1 class
} else if(dynamic_cast<Child2*>(ptr) != nullptr) {
    // ptr is object of Child2 class
}

Also if you are using smart pointers, like std::shared_ptr, you can check it like this:

std::shared_ptr<Parent> ptr(new Child1());
if(std::dynamic_pointer_cast<Child1>(ptr) != nullptr) {
    // ptr is object of Child1 class
} else if(std::dynamic_pointer_cast<Child2>(ptr) != nullptr) {
    // ptr is object of Child2 class
}
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Sure:

BaseClass *bptr = // whatever, pointer to base class
SubclassOne *safe_ptr_one = dynamic_cast<SubclassOne *>(bptr);
if (safe_ptr_one != nullptr) {
    // Instance of SubclassOne
} else {
    // not an instance of SubclassOne, try the other one
    SubclassTwo *safe_ptr_two = dynamic_cast<SubclassTwo *>(bptr);
    if (safe_ptr_two != nullptr) {
        // Instance of SubclassTwo
    } else {
        // it wasn't either one :'(
    }
}
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Nice -- I didn't know dynamic_cast could do that! (But then, that's why I asked.) –  ExOttoyuhr Apr 21 '13 at 21:10
    
@ExOttoyuhr You're welcome. And yay, I managed to provide an answer before Andy Prowl! –  user529758 Apr 21 '13 at 21:11
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