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Does anyone know how to detect a constructor with one argument? For example, this struct should have a negative result:

struct MyStruct
{
  MyStruct( int x, int x2 ) : y( x ) {}
  int y;
};

I have here a nice SFINAE check to see if a class or struct as a constructor with a specific number of arguments. Here's the one for argument count of 3:

template <typename T>
struct HasCtor3Args
{
  struct Any { template <typename U> operator U( void ); };

  template <typename U>
  static int32 SFINAE( decltype( U( Any( ), Any( ), Any( ) ) ) * );

  template <typename U>
  static int8 SFINAE( ... );

  static const bool value = sizeof( SFINAE<T>( NULL ) ) == sizeof( int32 );
};

This seems to work just fine, as the Any struct can convert to whatever types the parameters ought to be. However the issue is when trying to detect a constructor with just one argument. The SFINAE check seems to always return true due to defaulting Any to the same type as T thus detecting a copy constructor.

Edit and Update: I've made a few attempts, none seem to be a go... This was the closest I can get, but doesn't work as it always returns true. The idea was to try and get the copy constructor to resolve instead of the first "catch all" call:

template <typename T>
struct HasCtor1Args
{
  struct Any
  {
    template <typename U>
    operator U( ) const;
  };

  template <typename U>
  static int32 SFINAE( decltype( U( Any( ) ) ) * );

  // Try to catch the copy ctor here
  T MakeT( void );
  template <typename U>
  static int8 SFINAE( decltype( U( MakeT( ) ) ) * );

  template <typename U>
  static int8 SFINAE( ... );

  static const bool value = sizeof( SFINAE<T>( NULL ) ) == sizeof( int32 );
};

I also tried using the explicit keyword, along with the = delete feature for C++11, then realized the compiler I need to use (Microsoft's) does not allow this. I also tried using std::enable_if on the conversion type U, although I ran into the error that function template parameters cannot be defaulted.

share|improve this question
    
Oh, and there's std::is_constructible –  dyp Apr 22 '13 at 0:23
    
For some reason, it works when the conversion operator is explicit: template < typename U > explicit operator U() const;. I had to look this up in the Standard, but it might be a bug in g++ 4.8. –  dyp Apr 22 '13 at 0:29
    
Hmm I don't think using explicit like that will work on Microsoft's compiler though. –  RandyGaul Apr 22 '13 at 0:37
2  
If there are two one-argument constructors, substitution will fail. I don't think there is a way around it. –  n.m. Apr 22 '13 at 6:24
1  
Well I'd interpret that as "takes exactly one argument", or, equivalently, "has exactly one parameter" ;) –  dyp Apr 22 '13 at 18:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Though n.m.'s criticism still holds, here's a version to detect a type with only one 1-parameter non-copy, non-move ctor. It uses SFINAE to restrict the conversion of Any.

Note: Additional ctors with default arguments would result in an ambiguity (e.g. my_type(int, double=0);. It's a very limited solution.

#include <cstdint>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename T>
struct HasCtor1Args
{
    struct Any
    {
      template
      <
        typename U, typename SFINAE =
          typename std::enable_if< false == std::is_same<U,T>::value, U >::type
      >
      operator U() const;
    };

    template <typename U>
    static int32_t SFINAE( decltype( U( Any( ) ) ) * );

    template <typename U>
    static int8_t SFINAE( ... );

    static const bool value = sizeof( SFINAE<T>( nullptr ) ) == sizeof( int32_t );
};


struct my_type
{
    my_type(int);
    my_type(my_type const&);
};

int main()
{
    static_assert(HasCtor1Args<my_type> :: value, "epic fail");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ooh, wait, nvm... the parameter type would just be deduced as Any, I think. Same goes for default arguments. It will fail for template<class T> C(Something<T>), though. –  Xeo Apr 22 '13 at 16:53
    
I dont see why it would fail for that. T simply becomes the Any type. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 22 '13 at 16:54
    
@Johannes: Ya, see my new comment above. –  Xeo Apr 22 '13 at 16:54
    
.... but we had the same wrong thought, Xeo :D nevertheless, the default argument problem holds though, I think. –  dyp Apr 22 '13 at 16:56
    
You could overload the test function with a function whose parameter type definitely accepts the any type (but is not exactly the any type hence requiring a user defined conversion). If the call now ends up in an ambiguity (detect it by sfinae), then T has one or more one-arg accepting ctors). This will handle the ambiguities quite well (no pun intended). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 22 '13 at 17:14

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