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Using Knockout.js:

If an item/object is located within a viewmodel in more than one location (same exact object), is it possible for both items to be bound together so that if the user edits the item in one location, the other item is automatically updated as well?

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/77Jc5/1/

var model = {
    Foo : [
        {
            ID: 99,
            Title: 'This is item number ninety-nine',
            Description: 'This is an item included in more than one object'
        },
        {
            ID: 100,
            Title: 'This is item number one-hundred',
            Description: 'This is an item included in only one object'
        }
    ],
        Poo : [
        {
            ID: 99,
            Title: 'This is item number ninety-nine',
            Description: 'This is an item included in more than one object'
        }
    ]
};

In the example, when the user edits Item #99 in either Foo or Poo, I'd like it to change in both...preferably as the user is changing it (keypress event?).

SOLUTIONS

Your model should be look like this:

var model = {
    AllMembers: [
        { ID: 100, Title: 'This is item number 100' },
        { ID: 776, Title: 'This is item number 776' },
        { ID: 456, Title: 'This is item number 456' },
        { ID: 999, Title: 'This is item number 999' }
    ],
    Foo: [],
    Poo: []
};

Solution 1: (credit to @Joseph Gabriel)

http://jsfiddle.net/lamarant/hMutz/8/

In this solution, the Foo and Poo arrays will contain duplicate instances of the object. Knockout takes care of the syncing between objects. This works but from an architecture standpoint it is not ideal as data is duplicated throughout the view model.

Solution 2: (credit to @Jeff Mercado)

http://jsfiddle.net/jeff1203/rndM9/2/

In this solution, the Foo and Poo arrays will contain only the ID's of the referenced object. Architecturally, I think this is the correct way to go but it also comes at the cost of more code.

If you're reading this, at the end of the day you will probably be posting the view model to a server for processing, which will likely entail saving the model back to your database. Both solutions adequately handle the 1-many relationship that exists in your database. In my requirement, I am also adding new elements to the AllMembers array using sequential negatives as ID numbers (ID: -1, ID: -2, etc.). The server-side processing sequence should look like this:

  1. Create an array to map negative ID's to their corresponding database newly created ID's in the database
  2. Loop through the members in the AllMembers array and update/create each member in the database. If creating a new member, add it's negative and new ID to the array you created in step 1.
  3. Remove all existing 1-many relationships between Foo/Poo in your database as your model is now the master of that information
  4. Loop through Poo and Foo, and add all of the relationships to Foo/Poo from the model into the 1-many table (using the ID)

Whew...

Knockout is awesome.

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ideally, you should have only at most one copy of any object within the same view model. If you can help it, refactor your view model so your objects can reference an array/map containing all objects to minimize replication. Then your actual objects simply need to get the referenced objects.

var model = {
    _FooRefs: [99, 100],
    _PooRefs: [99],
    _AllObjects: [
        {
            ID: 99,
            Title: 'This is item number ninety-nine',
            Description: 'This is an item included in more than one object'
        },
        {
            ID: 100,
            Title: 'This is item number one-hundred',
            Description: 'This is an item included in only one object'
        }
    ]
};
function ViewModel(data) {
    var self = this;
    ko.mapping.fromJS(data, {
        _AllObjects: {
            key: function (obj) {
                return obj.ID;
            }
        }
    }, self);

    self.Foo = ko.computed(function () {
        var fooRefs = ko.utils.unwrapObservable(self._FooRefs);
        return ko.utils.arrayMap(fooRefs, function (id) {
            // mappedGet was added to mapping plugin version 2.4.1
            return self._AllObjects.mappedGet({ ID: id });
        });
    });

    self.Poo = ko.computed(function () {
        var pooRefs = ko.utils.unwrapObservable(self._PooRefs);
        return ko.utils.arrayMap(pooRefs, function (id) {
            return self._AllObjects.mappedGet({ ID: id });
        });
    });
}

fiddle

To add objects to the array, you need to ensure that the object exists in your array/map and then add the object's key to the array of references. To remove an item, remove the reference and optionally remove the object.


If doing this is not an option and you'll need to keep the duplication, you can probably use the postbox plugin to help keep the objects synchronized. This approach would be best if the objects exist in separate view models.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. I'm refactoring my code to see if this would work. Having trouble with Adding and removing the items dynamically. Take a look here: jsfiddle.net/hMutz/5. The self.addMember and self.removeMember methods are stumping me. Help would be appreciated. –  lamarant Apr 23 '13 at 15:22
1  
I've updated the fiddle to demonstrate: jsfiddle.net/jeff1203/XZGek/3. It could probably be designed better, it becomes quite a mess when you have to deal with the observables. –  Jeff Mercado Apr 24 '13 at 3:09
    
This is fantastic. I think both versions work but architecturally this is the proper way to represent the data in the viewmodel. I added some debugging info to the fiddle: jsfiddle.net/XZGek/5. Appreciate the help! –  lamarant Apr 24 '13 at 14:06
    
One minor fix you should make for the sake of correctness. Otherwise if you don't, your app may crash under some circumstances. In the addObject() method in the extender, the target.push(id) line should come after the object gets added to the full map of objects. The object must exist in the mappedObjects array before adding the reference. jsfiddle.net/jeff1203/rndM9/2 –  Jeff Mercado Apr 25 '13 at 8:27
    
answer updated. thanks again. –  lamarant Apr 25 '13 at 13:52
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The main thing to keep in mind is that knockout will update any objects that it is bound to, but in order to have the same object be updatable and reflect the changes in multiple locations, it must indeed, be the same object and not simply a clone.

Two objects having the same name and/or properties isn't enough. It must actually be a single object, pointing to the same memory address, that can then displayed and bound in multiple locations.

I would consider separating out your data from your viewModel so that you can reference the same item from as many places as necessary.

var items = [{
    ID: 99,
    Title: 'This is item number ninety-nine',
    Description: 'This is an item included in more than one object'
}, {
    ID: 100,
    Title: 'This is item number one-hundred',
    Description: 'This is an item included in only one object'
}];

var model = {
    Foo : [
        items[0],
        items[1]
    ],
        Poo : [
        items[0]
    ]
};
var viewModel = ko.mapping.fromJS(model);
ko.applyBindings(viewModel);

That said, it seems a little awkward to have duplicate references directly in your view model. I don't know what your scenario is, but would it be possible to use a Ko. computed to give you the "poo" values, or vice - versa?

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thanks. take a look at the update to my question. I'm using this approach but I now need to be able to dynamically add items in the "items" array to both Foo and Poo and still retain the linking between all items...getting close: jsfiddle.net/77Jc5/12. New to KO but KO.computed sounds like it may be the right way to go? –  lamarant Apr 22 '13 at 21:31
    
You're starting to run into issues because you're defining the model as a plain JS object, then later converting it to observables. Inside of addMember, the AllMembers that is referenced is holding a reference to the plain JS version. What you have is close, but it's very difficult to get working reliably because the references aren't what you expect. It would be better to set up the observables the way you want them from the beginning. I also recommend that you restructure your view model. Maybe like this: var vm = {}; vm.allMembers = ...; vm.addMember = function();/ ... return vm; –  Joseph Gabriel Apr 22 '13 at 22:29
    
One main thing that's causing the problem is that the $data inside your template is not an observable. In order to get the observable, you can wrap the value in an object before setting the data property on the template. Like this: stackoverflow.com/a/8989907/91189 –  Joseph Gabriel Apr 22 '13 at 22:31
    
What about this: jsfiddle.net/77Jc5/15. This one works. Am I breaking any conventions here? –  lamarant Apr 23 '13 at 1:30
2  
Unfortunately the way you have it now, the final mapped view model will contain completely different instances due to how the mapping plugin works. You would need to add the items to Foo and Poo after the model has been mapped. –  Jeff Mercado Apr 23 '13 at 3:13
show 5 more comments

If you wrote code like this:

var num99 = {
            ID: 99,
            Title: 'This is item number ninety-nine',
            Description: 'This is an item included in more than one object'
        };

var model = {
    Foo : [
        num99,
        {
            ID: 100,
            Title: 'This is item number one-hundred',
            Description: 'This is an item included in only one object'
        }
    ],
        Poo : [
        num99
    ]
};

Then Foo and Poo do, indeed, point to the same object, so that changing one would change the other.

jsFiddle example

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-1: Doing this does not solve the problem. Imagine having thousands of items coming from a server as JSON. You should not duplicate each item like that. –  Alerty Apr 22 '13 at 1:39
1  
It solves the problem as described. OP makes no mention of needing to support requests to the server that return JSON. –  Dancrumb Apr 22 '13 at 1:46
    
Using JSON from the server was only an example to state how inefficient it is in a real world context. Your solution is not scalable. You should not have a model object 'Poo' with a reference to 'Foo' in good MVVM architecture. You should only use 'Foo' once with every view or view section. –  Alerty Apr 22 '13 at 1:58
    
You're assuming that Poo is redundant in the OP's post. This isn't a safe assumption. For instance, Foo and Poo could refer to two different sets whose membership can change over time, but may contain common members. –  Dancrumb Apr 22 '13 at 18:30
    
As to the inefficiency of my solution in the context that Foo and Poo are not redundant, you are incorrect. A single definition of the object num99 and reference to that object in each set is the efficient approach. Duplicate instances of identical objects is the inefficient approach. –  Dancrumb Apr 22 '13 at 18:31
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From the architecture point of view, I believe that you should not be duplicating your model like this. Instead only use 'Foo' and use it on multiple views. You have less code duplication, everything happens automatically and it is a lot less error prone.

To do this, you can use the function ko.applyBindings() on multiple elements.

Little example here which also has the keypress event: http://jsfiddle.net/Z5yGf/2/

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This doesn't address the OP's need to have an item present in both Foo and Poo. –  Dancrumb Apr 22 '13 at 1:48
    
With this solution, you don't need the object to be present in Foo and Poo, only in Foo. I'm solving this by looking from the architecture level. –  Alerty Apr 22 '13 at 2:02
    
Why call it twice? jsfiddle.net/Z5yGf/3 –  Anders Apr 22 '13 at 7:18
    
To show that it is possible to have two distinct views. –  Alerty Apr 22 '13 at 11:29
    
@Alerty, you don't know the OP's architecture. Foo and Poo may not be redundant. Since they're arrays, their membership list may change over time, but there's nothing in the OP's question that indicates that Poo wouldn't, at some point, contain members that Foo does not. –  Dancrumb Apr 22 '13 at 18:33
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