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Okay, so I'm trying to send private members that have been updated in my program to an access database. However whenever I run the program and press the save button, I get a "Data type mismatch in criteria expression" exception thrown at me.

Here is the code snippet that I am using. It is throwing the exception at the da.Update command. So I know it has something to do with my update command or my parameters. I also commented out the repetitive parts since I have been trying to narrow down the issue.

OleDbConnection conn = new OleDbConnection(ConnString);

        string sql = @" SELECT * FROM Account where AccountID = '" + accountName + @"'";

        string update = @" UPDATE Account SET
                        Cash = '@Cash'";/*, PaidInCapital = '@PaidInCapital',
                        TotalRetainedEarnings = '@TotalRetainedEarnings',
                        StockholdersEquity = '@StockholdersEquity',
                        CommonStock = '@CommonStock', PreferredStock = '@PreferredStock',
                        TreasuryStock = '@TreasuryStock', CashDividends = '@CashDividends',
                        StockDividends = '@StockDividends', @"TotalNumberPreferred = '@TotalNumberPreferred',
                        PreferredMarketPrice = '@PreferredMarketPrice', PreferredPar = '@PreferredPar',
                        Cumulative = '@Cumulative', TotalNumberCommon = '@TotalNumberCommon',
                        CommonMarketPrice = '@CommonMarketPrice', CommonPar = '@CommonPar',
                        NumberTransactTreasuryStock = '@NumberTransactTreasuryStock',
                        AvgPriceTreasury = '@AvgPriceTreasury'";*/


        try
        {
            OleDbDataAdapter da = new OleDbDataAdapter();

            da.SelectCommand = new OleDbCommand(sql, conn);

            AccountDatabaseDataSet ds = new AccountDatabaseDataSet();

            da.Fill(ds, "Account");

            DataTable dt = ds.Tables["Account"];

            dt.Rows[0][1] = cash;
            /*dt.Rows[0][2] = paidInCapital;
            dt.Rows[0][3] = totalRetainedEarnings;
            dt.Rows[0][4] = stockholdersEquity;
            dt.Rows[0][5] = commonStock;
            dt.Rows[0][6] = preferredStock;
            dt.Rows[0][7] = treasuryStock;
            dt.Rows[0][8] = cashDividends;
            dt.Rows[0][9] = stockDividends;
            dt.Rows[0][10] = totalNumberPreferred;
            dt.Rows[0][11] = preferredMarketPrice;
            dt.Rows[0][12] = preferredPar;
            dt.Rows[0][13] = preferredRate;
            dt.Rows[0][14] = cumulative;
            dt.Rows[0][15] = totalNumberCommon;
            dt.Rows[0][16] = commonMarketPrice;
            dt.Rows[0][17] = commonPar;
            dt.Rows[0][18] = numberTransactTreasury;
            dt.Rows[0][19] = avgPriceTreasury;*/

            OleDbCommand cmd = new OleDbCommand(update, conn);

            cmd.Parameters.Add("@Cash", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "Cash");
            /*cmd.Parameters.Add("@PaidInCapital", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "PaidInCapital");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@TotalRetainedEarnings", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "TotalRetainedEarnings");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@StockholdersEquity", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "StockholdersEquity");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@CommonStock", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "CommonStock");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@PreferredStock", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "PreferredStock");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@TreasuryStock", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "TreasuryStock");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@CashDividends", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "CashDividends");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@StockDividends", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "StockDividends");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@TotalNumberPreferred", OleDbType.Integer, 16, "TotalNumberPreferred");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@PreferredMarketPrice", OleDbType.Decimal, 10, "PreferredMarketPrice");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@PreferredPar", OleDbType.Decimal, 10, "PreferredPar");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@PreferredRate", OleDbType.Decimal, 5, "PreferredRate");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@Cumulative", OleDbType.Boolean, 2, "Cumulative");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@TotalNumberCommon", OleDbType.Integer, 16, "TotalNumberCommon");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@CommonMarketPrice", OleDbType.Decimal, 10, "CommonMarketPrice");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@CommonPar", OleDbType.Decimal, 10, "CommonPar");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@NumberTransactTreasuryStock", OleDbType.Integer, 16, "NumberTransactTreasuryStock");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@AvgPriceTreasury", OleDbType.Decimal, 10, "AvgPriceTreasury");*/


            da.UpdateCommand = cmd;
            da.Update(ds, "Account");

Essentially narrowed down to this if you take out the commented parts:

OleDbConnection conn = new OleDbConnection(ConnString);

        string sql = @" SELECT * FROM Account where AccountID = '" + accountName + @"'";

        string update = @" UPDATE Account SET
                        Cash = '@Cash'";
        try{
            OleDbDataAdapter da = new OleDbDataAdapter();

            da.SelectCommand = new OleDbCommand(sql, conn);

            AccountDatabaseDataSet ds = new AccountDatabaseDataSet();

            da.Fill(ds, "Account");

            DataTable dt = ds.Tables["Account"];

            dt.Rows[0][1] = cash;

            OleDbCommand cmd = new OleDbCommand(update, conn);

            cmd.Parameters.Add("@Cash", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "Cash");

            da.UpdateCommand = cmd;
            da.Update(ds, "Account");
         }

So, basically what I have is an "Account" table that I want to set the second[1] column equal to the private member variable "cash" that is of type decimal. Then I set my parameters for the "@Cash" param where the OleDbType is a Decimal, the size is 18, and the column in the access database is "Cash". Finally I update the "Account" Table with this value.

Now I have tried changing .Decimal in my oledbtype to every possible type in the list, but it never seems to work and even some of the exceptions state it as a "Decimal type that cannot convert to DateTime", for instance. So I am led to believe that the oledbtype is not the problem. I have also tried messing with the size in the parameter and that has not worked either.

I have tried to explain this the best I can, but if there is anything else that would be beneficial to help solve this problem I will provide it.

share|improve this question
    
Why do people give OleDbParameters names? msdn.microsoft.com/en-AU/library/… The OLE DB .NET Provider does not support named parameters for passing parameters to an SQL statement or a stored procedure called by an OleDbCommand when CommandType is set to Text. In this case, the question mark (?) placeholder must be used. –  ta.speot.is Apr 22 '13 at 3:53
    
But disregarding the documentation how it should be done, UPDATE Account SET Cash = '@Cash' is wrong: you don't need to put ' around the parameter placeholder. –  ta.speot.is Apr 22 '13 at 3:55
    
@ ta.speot.is Well apparently it might, I just took out the "'" like you stated in your second comment, added a where clause to the update, and I was able to get it to work. Although it is quite verbose, I believe it functions as it should. –  William Parks Apr 22 '13 at 6:59
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3 Answers 3

Here is the code that solved my updating woes for future reference of those who need the help. This is using a Dataset for MS Access in Visual Studio 2012:

public void UpdateValues(string accountName)
    {
        OleDbConnection conn = new OleDbConnection(ConnString);

        string sql = @" SELECT * FROM Account where AccountID = '" + accountName + @"'";

        string update = "UPDATE Account SET Cash = ?, PaidInCapital = ?, TotalRetainedEarnings = ?, StockholdersEquity = ?, " +
                        "CommonStock = ?, PreferredStock = ?, TreasuryStock = ?, CashDividends = ?, StockDividends = ?, " +
                        "TotalNumberPreferred = ?, PreferredMarketPrice = ?, PreferredPar = ?, Cumulative = ?, TotalNumberCommon = ?, " +
                        "CommonMarketPrice = ?, CommonPar = ?, NumberTransactTreasuryStock = ?, AvgPriceTreasury = ? WHERE AccountID = '" + accountName + "'";
        try
        {
            OleDbDataAdapter da = new OleDbDataAdapter();

            da.SelectCommand = new OleDbCommand(sql, conn);

            AccountDatabaseDataSet ds = new AccountDatabaseDataSet();

            da.Fill(ds, "Account");

            DataTable dt = ds.Tables["Account"];

            dt.Rows[0][1] = cash;
            dt.Rows[0][2] = paidInCapital;
            dt.Rows[0][3] = totalRetainedEarnings;
            dt.Rows[0][4] = stockholdersEquity;
            dt.Rows[0][5] = commonStock;
            dt.Rows[0][6] = preferredStock;
            dt.Rows[0][7] = treasuryStock;
            dt.Rows[0][8] = cashDividends;
            dt.Rows[0][9] = stockDividends;
            dt.Rows[0][10] = totalNumberPreferred;
            dt.Rows[0][11] = preferredMarketPrice;
            dt.Rows[0][12] = preferredPar;
            dt.Rows[0][13] = preferredRate;
            dt.Rows[0][14] = cumulative;
            dt.Rows[0][15] = totalNumberCommon;
            dt.Rows[0][16] = commonMarketPrice;
            dt.Rows[0][17] = commonPar;
            dt.Rows[0][18] = numberTransactTreasury;
            dt.Rows[0][19] = avgPriceTreasury;

            OleDbCommand cmd = new OleDbCommand(update, conn);

            cmd.Parameters.Add("@Cash", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "Cash");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@PaidInCapital", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "PaidInCapital");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@TotalRetainedEarnings", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "TotalRetainedEarnings");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@StockholdersEquity", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "StockholdersEquity");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@CommonStock", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "CommonStock");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@PreferredStock", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "PreferredStock");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@TreasuryStock", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "TreasuryStock");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@CashDividends", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "CashDividends");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@StockDividends", OleDbType.Decimal, 18, "StockDividends");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@TotalNumberPreferred", OleDbType.Integer, 16, "TotalNumberPreferred");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@PreferredMarketPrice", OleDbType.Decimal, 10, "PreferredMarketPrice");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@PreferredPar", OleDbType.Decimal, 10, "PreferredPar");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@PreferredRate", OleDbType.Decimal, 5, "PreferredRate");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@Cumulative", OleDbType.Boolean, 2, "Cumulative");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@TotalNumberCommon", OleDbType.Integer, 16, "TotalNumberCommon");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@CommonMarketPrice", OleDbType.Decimal, 10, "CommonMarketPrice");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@CommonPar", OleDbType.Decimal, 10, "CommonPar");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@NumberTransactTreasuryStock", OleDbType.Integer, 16, "NumberTransactTreasuryStock");
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@AvgPriceTreasury", OleDbType.Decimal, 10, "AvgPriceTreasury");

            da.UpdateCommand = cmd;
            da.Update(ds, "Account");
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message + ex.StackTrace, "Exception Details");
        }
        finally
        {
            conn.Close();
        }
    }
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You say it is throwing an exception. Have you tried catching the exception and examining it in more detail? Sometimes the exception will have an InnerException property which can contain more details of an error thrown by complex objects such as OleDb.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it is stated as follows: Data type mismatch in criteria expression. at System.Data.Common.DbDataAdapter.UpdatedRowStatusErrors(RowUpda tedEventArgs rowUpdatedEvent, BatchCommandInfo[] batchCommands, Inter32 commandCount) etc. –  William Parks Apr 22 '13 at 5:11
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if you need to update row on database try below

using (OleDbConnection conn = new OleDbConnection(ConnString))
 {
       conn.Open();
       using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
       {
            cmd.CommandText = "UPDATE Account SET Cash=? WHERE AccountID =?";
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@p1", OleDbType.Decimal).Value = 3.1416;
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@p2", OleDbType.Integer).Value = accountName;
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
       }
 }
  • Use parameters otherwise your query open for sql injection attacks
  • The OLE DB.NET Framework Data Provider uses positional parameters that are marked with a question mark (?) instead of named parameters.
share|improve this answer
    
The OLE DB.NET Framework Data Provider uses positional parameters that are marked with a question mark (?) instead of named parameters. Yet you still name yours. Look at the example, just .Add the values. Also, OleDbCommand is IDisposable so consider a using statement here. –  ta.speot.is Apr 22 '13 at 3:57
    
@ta.speot.is added using block, but we can name parameters when declare. please check examples on MSDN –  Damith Apr 22 '13 at 4:28
    
@Damith Okay, so i made the changes and now my code looks like this: <code> using (OleDbConnection conn = new OleDbConnection(ConnString)) { try { conn.Open(); using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand()) { cmd.CommandText = "UPDATE Account SET Cash = ?, PaidInCapital = ?, WHERE AccountID = ?"; cmd.Parameters.Add("@Cash", OleDbType.Decimal).Value = cash; cmd.Parameters.Add("@PaidInCapital", OleDbType.Decimal).Value = paidInCapital; cmd.Parameters.Add("@AccountId", OleDbType.VarChar).Value = accountName; cmd.ExecuteNonQuery(); } }</code> But it still doesn't update anything in the database –  William Parks Apr 22 '13 at 5:58
    
any exceptions? where you put access file in your solution? –  Damith Apr 22 '13 at 6:03
    
@Damith None, the access file is in the same folder as my source code. And I know I can access the database because I populate a list at the very beginning. –  William Parks Apr 22 '13 at 6:05
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