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I have

  • base.html
  • pageA.html
  • pageB.html
  • pageA.js
  • pageB.js

    1. pageA.js has code for pageA.html, pageB.js has code for pageB.html.
    2. both pageA.js and pageB.js uses jQuery.

currently I am including all of the scripts in base.html, like so:

<html>
  <body>
    <div id="contents">
      <!-- pageA.html / pageB.html comes here -->
    </div>
    <script src="js/jquery.js"></script>
    <script src="js/pageA.js"></script>
    <script src="js/pageB.js"></script>
  </body>
</html>

I'd like to load pageA.js only for pageA.html and pageB.js for pageB.html, as the code in each file is not needed in the other page.

I've looked into requires.js library, but I'm not sure yet if it is the right solution for my problem. What are the best practices for structuring javascript files in this type of situation?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think that the best you can do is add the <script src="js/pageX.js"></script> in the end of the pageX.html IF this page is loaded dynamically. If the page isn't loaded dynamically, it may load before jquery.js and break you javascript.

Or you can read the current URL and load the correct script based on this info, like this:

var scriptPath;
var currentPage = window.location.pathname;

if (currentPage == "pageA.html")
{
    scriptPath = "pageA.js";
}
else if (currentPage == "pageB.html")
{
    scriptPath = "pageB.js";
}

var scriptElement = document.createElement("script");
scriptElement.setAttribute("type", "text/javascript");
scriptElement.setAttribute("src", scriptPath);

document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0].appendChild(scriptElement);
share|improve this answer
1  
The only problem with this approach is you have to remember to clean up the script elements after each change. If you are in a situation where someone loads page A, then page B, then page A again, it could cause conflicts. But a very nice idea if done right! –  Ambrosia Apr 22 '13 at 4:11
    
@Ambrosia +1, good point. But, note that my first approach is the same that yours (adding the script tag at the end of each html) and the second one takes in consideration that the page will reload, but if the URL changes (without full reloading), yes, can be a big problem... –  NemoStein Apr 22 '13 at 4:26
    
Ah yes, you are going to do an entire reload to run that. I suppose that'll avoid the conflict. Also something to note, I think you have to wait until the DOM is completely finished loading before you can make changes to content in the <head> tag so you might want to wrap it in a $(document).ready(function(){}); block. If you remove a script by changing the src (after DOM loading) does it remove the functions from the browser's memory or could there still be a conflict? I might try writing another dynamic script changer to test this. –  Ambrosia Apr 22 '13 at 4:33
1  
@Ambrosia, Just tried those two Hypothesis locally on FireFox. First, you don't need to wait the whole DOM to start poking it (I added the script in the body AND head sections). Second, even removing the whole script tag from the DOM, the code in that file kept running. –  NemoStein Apr 22 '13 at 4:53
    
Oh sorry, I misread my source. DOM can be unfinished although "it is not possible to change the src attribute before the render reaches the tag". - SO - Makes sense. –  Ambrosia Apr 22 '13 at 4:58

Do you have JavaScript to load in the contents of each html file? If so, and you have JavaScript code to run once each file is loaded you can call the required setup functions inside the load function like this:

base.html

<html>
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="js/jquery.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="js/pageA.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="js/pageB.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            $(document).ready(function()
            {
                $('#loadPageA').on('click', function()
                {
                    $('#contents').load('pageA.html', function()
                    {
                        setupPageA(); // defined in pageA.js
                    });
                });

                $('#loadPageB').on('click', function()
                {
                    $('#contents').load('pageB.html', function()
                    {
                        setupPageB(); // defined in pageB.js
                    });
                });
            });
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="contents"></div>
        <a id="loadPageA">Load Page A</a>
        <a id="loadPageB">Load Page B</a>
    </body>
<html>

Or, you if you just want to run pageA.js when pageA.html is loaded in you can just include the pageA.js script element in page pageA.html itself, like this:

pageA.html:

<div id="pageAContent">Page A</div>
<script type="text/javascript src="js/pageA.js"></script>

pageB.html:

<div id="pageBContent">Page B</div>
<script type="text/javascript src="js/pageB.js"></script>

base.html:

<html>
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="js/jquery.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            $(document).ready(function()
            {
                $('#loadPageA').on('click', function()
                {
                    $('#contents').load('pageA.html');
                });

                $('#loadPageB').on('click', function()
                {
                    $('#contents').load('pageB.html');
                });
            });
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="contents"></div>
        <a id="loadPageA">Load Page A</a>
        <a id="loadPageB">Load Page B</a>
    </body>
<html>

The dynamic script src solution:

base.html:

<html>
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            function loadScript(script)
            {
                // Modify the existing script tag
                if($('#dynamicScriptTag').length != 0)
                {
                    $('#dynamicScriptTag').attr('src', script);
                }
                else // Create script tag
                {
                    $('<script>').attr('type', 'text/javascript')
                                 .attr('src', script)
                                 .attr('id', 'dynamicScriptTag')
                                 .appendTo('head');
                }
            }

            $(document).ready(function()
            {
                $('#loadPageA').on('click', function(event)
                {
                    event.preventDefault();
                    $('#contents').load('pageA.html', function()
                    {
                        loadScript('js/scriptA.js');
                        testScriptB(); // test if we can still call a function in scriptB.js
                    });
                });

                $('#loadPageB').on('click', function(event)
                {
                    event.preventDefault();
                    $('#contents').load('pageB.html', function()
                    {
                        loadScript('js/scriptB.js')
                        testScriptA(); // test if we can still call a function in scriptA.js
                    });
                });
            });
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="contents"></div>
        <a id="loadPageA" href="#">Load Page A</a>
        <a id="loadPageB" href="#">Load Page B</a>
    </body>
</html>

pageA.html:

<div id="pageAContents">Page A</div>

pageB.html:

<div id="pageBContents">Page B</div>

js/scriptA.js:

console.log($('#pageAContents').text());
function testScriptA(){ console.log('Can still call testScriptA!'); }

js/scriptB.js:

console.log($('#pageBContents').text());
function testScriptB(){ console.log('Can still call testScriptB!'); }
share|improve this answer
    
The problem with your first approach is that the whole content of pageA.js and pageB.js will be downloaded, even if it isn't in use. –  NemoStein Apr 22 '13 at 4:01
1  
That is true, if they aren't big scripts then it's not really a problem. However this problem is avoided completely with the second solution. –  Ambrosia Apr 22 '13 at 4:05
    
Yes, it looks as though once the script is loaded into the browser it is there to stay (presumably until you close the tab/window). I'll update my answer with a demo of this and a quick way to change the script src if it is still of more use than the other approaches. –  Ambrosia Apr 22 '13 at 4:42
    
Functions defined again with the same name (caused by a second loading of a script) will just overwrite the old functions. References to functions are still in memory even when the script is removed or src changed. –  Ambrosia Apr 22 '13 at 4:52

I ended up using Jinja(a template engine) to place the javascript files like following:

base.html

<html>
  <body>
    <div id="contents">
      {% block contents %}
      {% endblock %}
    </div>
    <script src="js/jquery.js"></script>
      {% block scripts %}      
      {% endblock %}       
  </body>
</html>

pageA.html

{% block contents %}
   ..page A contents..
{% endblock %}
{% block scripts %}
<script src="js/pageA.js"></script>
{% endblock %}

If you are using a template engine, it could be a viable solution.

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