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I have an old VB6 project that I am converting to C#. I have a string. I am verifying, 1 character at a time, that it only contains [E0-9.+-].

This is the old VB6 code:

sepIndex = 1

Do While Mid(xyString, sepIndex, 1) Like "[E0-9.+-]"
    sepIndex = sepIndex + 1
Loop

I am then using the index number to calculate the Left of the same string, and convert it to a double. Using Right, I then cut the string down to the remaining part of the string that I want:

xFinal = CDbl(left(xyString, sepIndex - 1))
xyString = LTrim(right(xyString, Len(xyString) - sepIndex + 1))

This works great in VB, and I have no problems whatsoever. In C# it is different. Knowing that the only way to emulate Left/Mid/Right in C# is to create my own function, I did so (part of my Utils namespace):

public static string Mid(string param, int startIndex)
   {
       try
       {

           //start at the specified index and return all characters after it
           //and assign it to a variable
           string result = param.Substring(startIndex);
           //return the result of the operation
           return result;
       }
       catch
       {
           return string.Empty;
       }
   }

public static string Right(string param, int length)
   {
       try
       {
           //start at the index based on the lenght of the sting minus
           //the specified lenght and assign it a variable
           string result = param.Substring(param.Length - length, length);
           //return the result of the operation
           return result;
       }
       catch
       {
           return string.Empty;
       }
   }
public static string Left(string param, int length)
   {
       try
       {
           //we start at 0 since we want to get the characters starting from the
           //left and with the specified lenght and assign it to a variable
           string result = param.Substring(0, length);
           //return the result of the operation
           return result;
       }
       catch
       {
           return string.Empty;
       }
   }

To the best of my knowledge, I have converted the code from VB6 to C#. The problem is that when it finally sets xyString, it is cutting the string in the wrong spot, and still leaving a trailing character that I want in xFinal.

From what I gather, this may be either an index issue (which I know in C#, Substring is 0-based, so I changed sepIndex to the value of 0), or problem with the wrong loop structure.

Here is the converted code, and I hope I could get some idea of what is going on here:

sepIndex = 0;

while (Regex.IsMatch(Utils.Mid(xyString, sepIndex, 1), "[E0-9.+-]"))
{
    sepIndex++;
}

xFinal = Convert.ToDouble(Utils.Left(xyString, sepIndex - 1)); // - 1
xyString = Utils.Right(xyString, xyString.Length - sepIndex + 1).TrimStart(' '); // + 1

EDIT

This has been solved. I simply removed the +1 and -1 from my Utils.Left function, and it returned the proper string. Thanks for the inputs.

share|improve this question
    
Well I looked a little closer after the help here. I switched the +1/-1 on the Utils.Left/Utils.Right functions, and it is working. I had a feeling it was index problem. Thanks for the help guys! –  JuniperAsh Apr 22 '13 at 4:54
1  
Correct me if I'm wrong, but this question has nothing to do with the title. –  Verdolino Apr 23 '13 at 23:43
    
+1 for totally correcting that mistake. I will change it. –  JuniperAsh Apr 23 '13 at 23:44

3 Answers 3

Seems to be just RegEx math with negative condition - "[^E0-9.+-]":

 var sepIndex = Regex.Match(xyString, @"[^E0-9\.+-]+").Index;

If you need to do it by hand the easiest way to get single character is to just get single character from the string without trimming:

  // replace Utils.Mid(xyString, sepIndex, 1) with
  xyString[sepIndex] 
share|improve this answer

Try using following

do{
   sepIndex++;
}while (Regex.IsMatch(Utils.Mid(xyString, sepIndex, 1), "[E0-9.+-]"))
share|improve this answer
    
This unfortunately resulted in the same outcome. –  JuniperAsh Apr 22 '13 at 4:46

why not importing microsoft.visualbasic namespace?

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string t = Microsoft.VisualBasic.Strings.Mid("hello", 2);
    }
}

you can reuse what you had before

share|improve this answer
    
I wanted to try to keep away from that. Either way thanks for the input! If you read my comment, this has be solved. I just didn't want to answer my own question and receive the unfortunately standard downvotes and "This should have been in a comment, or an edit" comments. –  JuniperAsh Apr 23 '13 at 23:54

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