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This is more of a style question because I'm aware that in practice most compilers will probably optimize to give the same effect, but I keep reading that, in general, you should always declare/define variables in the scope that they are used. So in situations where I can't inline the declaration, such as the following snippet, I've thought about enclosing the index variables in scoping brackets (curly brackets, not sure what you call them in this case) in order to explicitely limit the scope of those variables. Is this good practice? If so, can you please explain why?

{
    size_t i = 0; // this variable has no use outside of the range-based for loop
    for (auto const input : input_vector)
    {
        neuron_sequence[i].ForceSignal(input);
        ++i;
    }
}
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2  
"curly brackets, not sure what you call them in this case" They're called "curly braces." In all cases ;) –  Nicol Bolas Apr 22 '13 at 5:03
    
"most compilers will probably optimize to give the same effect". Could you please cite a situation? –  Mark Garcia Apr 22 '13 at 5:04
1  
"most compilers will probably optimize to give the same effect" - often not possible given 3.7.3/3: "If a variable with automatic storage duration has initialization or a destructor with side effects, it shall not be destroyed before the end of its block, nor shall it be eliminated as an optimization even if it appears to be unused, except that a class object or its copy/move may be eliminated as specified in 12.8." –  Tony D Apr 22 '13 at 5:53
    
@NicolBolas: the Standard just calls them braces... curly is redundant. –  Tony D Apr 22 '13 at 7:38
    
Thanks for the responses. All very helpful. –  quant Apr 22 '13 at 7:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Of course it's a good practice. It clearly limits where that variable can be used. I do this quite often. Scoping like this is also used to force some objects destructors to run.

For example:

std::vector<int> v;
v.resize( 10 ); // now holds memory for 10 ints

How do you clean up this memory? There's no function to call or any way of manually telling the vector v to clean up its memory. A solution is to force it to go out of scope (assuming I used swap correctly):

std::vector<int> v;
v.resize( 10 ); // now holds memory for 10 ints
{
  std::vector<int> temp;
  temp.swap( v );
} // temp goes out of scope and clears the memory that v used to hold

Another common usage is within switch cases. Often times I need to create a temporary variable in a switch:

switch( val )
{
case constant:
  {
    int x = 10;
    // ... do stuff
  }
}

The last place I can remember off the top of my head is when writing test cases for some sort of code. When unit testing things often times I just want to write my test code as fast as possible without taking much dev-time. So, I place a bunch of related tests within a single function, but wrap up the local variables in separate scopes just to be sure I don't hit any strange bugs (perhaps sharing iterators through tests).

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2  
+1 on the whole, just a remark about the whole "manually telling the vector v to clean up / swap" thing: no need for an extra variable and scope, just do std::vector<int>().swap(v); it's a common idiom. –  syam Apr 22 '13 at 5:20
    
@syam I see, yeah that will work. However you don't know for sure exactly when the rvalue vector will go out of scope and destruct. With the additional scopes you know exactly when for sure. –  RandyGaul Apr 22 '13 at 5:21
1  
"you don't know for sure..." => yes you do: the vector is temporary since there is no variable to "hold" onto it, so it is destroyed immediately. It is exactly the same as the code you wrote, just less verbose. ;) –  syam Apr 22 '13 at 5:24
    
@syam Ah just looked it up and it looks like destruction happens at the end of the expression the rvalue was created in, so you're right! –  RandyGaul Apr 22 '13 at 5:28

Yes, you should explicitly scope variables:

  1. Scope defines the lifetime of local variables, So scoping the variables appropriately means that the variables are only alive till they serve their desired usage & do not just be alive and hog memory.
  2. In case of same named variables, local vairables hide or shadow the same named global ones. So making the scope explicit improves the readability for the reader.(Atleast i feel so)
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5  
The main downside is that excessive usage of extra scopes can lead to code clutter and reduced readability. It's a tradeoff. –  Antimony Apr 22 '13 at 5:07
    
@Antimony: That is a matter of perception & not technicality. Technically, scoping explicitly is the advice. –  Alok Save Apr 22 '13 at 5:08
    
@AlokSave: the question began "This is more of a style question..." - giving an answer that needs a post-facto comment saying "I'm only considering technical issues" is overly narrow. –  Tony D Apr 22 '13 at 5:52
    
@TonyD: I don't think this is a merely style question. If the OP thinks so that is his/her misunderstanding or lack of understanding of the matter at hand, which i dont think is the case because Q also says " Is this good practice? If so, can you please explain why?". I usually refain from answers that just say, Use this because I feel this I would rather answer a Q with technical basis. I provide a technical basis for my answer without indulging in non standard perception based talks. –  Alok Save Apr 22 '13 at 6:18
    
@Antimony if you find that explicit scoping clutters your code, than perhaps your current scope (e.g. function) does more than one thing and you might want to refactor it anyway into smaller functions. The local scoping is just one step away from a functional refactoring, so if anything it should reduce clutter. –  TemplateRex Apr 22 '13 at 6:56

For small data types like integers you really don't need to worry about that because as you said it compilers will optimize the code based on the liveness of a variable and whether it reaches a certain location. In this case it is more of a style issue. And I would recommend not doing it often because code readability and ease of maintenance is also as big of a factor as performance.

However for complex types it can be usefull to limit the lifetime like that. For example for a vector which internally allocates large amounts of memory this can save some space if its scope is limited like that.

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1  
The type shouldn't matter. It's about lifetime and visibility. –  Captain Obvlious Apr 22 '13 at 5:09
    
@CaptainObvlious Well it depends because for types involving pointers and dynamically allocated memory it is difficult for a compiler to effectively analyze liveness and reaching definitions. You can help it out if you can. –  Named Apr 22 '13 at 5:11
1  
@CaptainObvlious: "The type shouldn't matter. It's about lifetime and visibility." - type does matter: 3.7.3/3: "If a variable with automatic storage duration has initialization or a destructor with side effects, it shall not be destroyed before the end of its block, nor shall it be eliminated as an optimization even if it appears to be unused, except that a class object or its copy/move may be eliminated as specified in 12.8." –  Tony D Apr 22 '13 at 5:39
  • Tight scopes are good when you find yourself concerned about the lifetime of the object - typically because of the memory/resources used, or a desire to prevent accidental or facilitate deliberate reuse of the same identifier
    • e.g. doing some repetitive operations - perhaps even using macro substitutions - where a temporary is needed but changing the name serves no particular purpose and is tedious
  • You can't always do this: you'll run into lots of situations where the tightest possible scope that suits one variable overlaps with that of another variable: e.g. trying to "scope" a in { X a = 1; X b(a, 2); ++a; } ++b; destroys b too early
  • In some cases, creating masses of small scopes can considerably bloat the source code, making it harder to visually take in and maintain. There is some mental effort involved to check that the scope introduced doesn't have a controlling if/for/while statement and it's harder at a glance to see the overall function flow. Of course, reducing the number of variables left in scope further down the function can also reduce mental effort - so it's a balancing act.

Overall - it's good to be selective about it, but you'll develop a feeling for when it's warranted. If unsure, it probably doesn't matter.

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