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As far as I understand, when stuff is pushed_back into a vector, sometimes it has to allocate a new memory block, resulting in copying all the elements into it from the old memory block, calling their destructors. Since unique_ptr destructors delete the owned memory, how is it possible that they work with vector? Is it safe to use unique_ptr in vectors? Is it slower than regular pointers?

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3 Answers 3

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resulting in copying all the elements into it from the old memory block, calling their destructors. Since unique_ptr destructors delete the owned memory, how is it possible that they work with vector?

In fact, it's not strictly copying the elements any more, it is moving. For types that have no implicit or explicit move constructor, that's the same. But for unique_ptrs that means, new unique_ptrs are constructed in the newly allocated memory, given an rvalue-reference to the "old" unique_ptrs. Their move constructor does the right thing, i.e. it transfers ownership from the old to the new unique_ptrs, leaving the old ones empty so nothing gets deleted when they are destroyed.

Is it safe to use unique_ptr in vectors?

It's save to use unique_ptrs everywhere, as long as you respect language rules and "C++ common sense". That means, you will have to explicitly do stupid things to break unique_ptrs safe behavior. Among those are e.g. pretending to give ownership of the owned object to yet another smart pointer:

unique_ptr<T> ptr1 {new T()};
unique_ptr<T> ptr2 {ptr1.get()}; //two unique_ptr's owning the same object...

or some destructive actions involving reinterpret_cast, memcpy, memset or other stuff that don't respect C++ object lifetimes.

Is it slower than regular pointers?

Maybe. There is clearly some small overhead involved when moving a unique_ptr in comparison to copying a raw pointer, namely setting the original to zero. But whether that overhead can be optimized away or not depends on your compiler and optimizer. And as ever with performance, consult your profiler to assess whether it is slower and whether the slowdown matters. I bet it won't, and taking into account the amount of security the smart pointers will give you, just never ask about unique_ptr's performance.

Sidenote: If you know the size of your vector in advance, remeber to use vector::reserve(). It will save you the reallocations and moves of the unique_ptrs. And if you know only the approximate size your vector will have, don't be petty - unique_ptrs are not very big (normally as big as a raw pointer plus the deleter, which might or might not be optimized away), so reserving a few percent more won't hurt unless you really have tight memory constraints.

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so reserving a hundred more won't hurt unless you really have tight memory constraints. => well, given that most often containers are used for a dozen or so elements, I would prefer giving a rule of thumb expressed as a percentage; like 10% more. –  Matthieu M. Apr 22 '13 at 9:33
    
@MatthieuM. Thanks for the feedback, I rephrased that part. –  Arne Mertz Apr 22 '13 at 9:51
    
@Arne: if we can use unique_ptr<> in vector<> container then why not auto_ptr<>? Afterall auto_ptr<> also move the responsibility of the object to the new object. So using auto_ptr<> should also be safe in that sense. But i believe that is not the case? –  David Jun 24 '13 at 6:26
    
@David: The old auto_ptrs work somewhat like unique_ptrs in the sense that they transfer ownership. The issue is that they do so on copying, while unique_ptr transfers ownership of the object on moving. That means that with auto_ptr you can accidentally create a temporary copy of the pointer, transferring ownership to it and deleting the object when the temporary goes out of scope. With unique_ptr that is not possible as they have the copy-ctor deleted. auto_ptr is therefore deprecated since C++11, and unique_ptr is a full replacement with more safety. –  Arne Mertz Jun 24 '13 at 6:32
    
@Thanks Arne. +1 for this –  David Jun 25 '13 at 4:53

Well with move semantics it's possible to move a unique_ptr from one location to another. This will avoid destruction of the data the pointer holds as it gets "moved" with std::move from one memory location to another.

It is sort of like performing shallow copies from the old vector array to the new memory location as the vector grows.

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@RandyGual Afterall auto_ptr<> also support move sementic,it transfers the responsibility of the object to the new object. So using auto_ptr<> should also be safe in that sense. But i believe that is not the case? –  David Jun 24 '13 at 6:27

According to cppreference, one of the use cases for std::unique_ptr is use in "move-aware containers", such as std::vector. This implies that std::vector<T> is smart enough to detect when T is movable, which is the case for std::unique_ptr, and use the move constructor when resizing the vector.

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