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Is there a nice quick way to get every other entry in an array in Ruby ?

Either the odd or even entries values with 0 included in the odd.

I'd like to be able to use it like this

array1 += array2.odd_values

or

puts array2.odd_values.join("-")

for example

Update

This give exactly what I'm after but I'm sure there is a shorter version.

array1.each_with_index do |item,index| 
  if (index %2 ==0) then 
    array2.push(item) 
  end
end
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Is this for display purposes? If so, and if it's for the web CSS/javascript has a cleaner way of doing this. –  Elizabeth Buckwalter Oct 23 '09 at 15:21
1  
This isn't exactly on target, but see my answer to a (vaguely) related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1611431/small-question-on-scripting/… Note that I included the 0th element in the evens. –  Telemachus Oct 23 '09 at 15:22
    
Not for the web I'm afraid. To be honest I'm just avoiding having a loop as I'm sure there will be a clever Ruby way of doing this. –  Dean Smith Oct 23 '09 at 15:22
    
Is it every other entry or or odd/even entries? –  JRL Oct 23 '09 at 15:26
    
JRL - Every other entry Essentially I have data that's off the form info_type_a info_type_b info_type_a info_type_b etc. etc. I just want to extract all the info_type_a or info_type_b –  Dean Smith Oct 23 '09 at 15:31
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19 Answers

up vote 49 down vote accepted
a = ('a'..'z').to_a

a.values_at(* a.each_index.select {|i| i.even?})
# => ["a", "c", "e", "g", "i", "k", "m", "o", "q", "s", "u", "w", "y"]

a.values_at(* a.each_index.select {|i| i.odd?})
# => ["b", "d", "f", "h", "j", "l", "n", "p", "r", "t", "v", "x", "z"]

So, as requested

class Array
  def odd_values
    self.values_at(* self.each_index.select {|i| i.odd?})
  end
  def even_values
    self.values_at(* self.each_index.select {|i| i.even?})
  end
end
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Thanks everyone, this is the closest. –  Dean Smith Oct 23 '09 at 17:16
    
Dean, this includes 0 as the evens. This is inherent in using the % 2 (or derivative) approach. I handle that in my reply. –  ezpz Oct 23 '09 at 17:23
5  
Slightly faster to do: a.values_at(*a.each_index.select(&:even?)) –  James McKinney Sep 27 '12 at 18:39
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...

arr = ["0", "1", "2", "3"]
arr.select.each_with_index { |str, i| i.odd? }
arr.select.each_with_index { |str, i| i.even? }
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5  
Better than the accepted answer. –  mxcl Oct 25 '13 at 4:13
1  
I think select and each_with_index need to be the other way around for it to work -and in that case it'll return a list of tuples. –  Steve Feb 5 at 10:27
    
arr.each_with_index.select { |str, i| i.odd? }.map(&:first), will sort out the tuples. –  Steve Feb 5 at 10:36
    
@Steve it works fine. No need to complicate such a simple piece of code. Keep it simple, and all that. Good point RE returning tuples. –  Damien Roche Feb 11 at 5:22
    
Right you are. I was using this with ActiveRecord and forgot to put a to_a before select :flushed: –  Steve Feb 11 at 15:16
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Some crazy way using facets:

require 'facets'
array = [1,2,3,4,5]
odd = array.to_h.keys # 1,3,5
even = array.to_h.values.compact # 2,4
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This will probably never be read, but...

Simple and clean:

array2.map{ |n| n if n % 2 == 0 }.compact # evens

array2.map{ |n| n if n % 2 == 1 }.compact # odds

Just found an even more terse way (gotta love Ruby):

array2.find_all{ |n| n % 2 == 0 } # evens

array2.reject  { |n| n % 2 == 0 } # odds
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dst = []
array.each_slice(2) { |x| dst.push(x[1]) }

should give you an array of the odd indices.

Replace x[1] with x[0] for the even entries.

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Seems to return a nil value >> array1.each_slice(2) { |x| x[1] } => nil >> –  Dean Smith Oct 23 '09 at 15:56
    
That's an expensive eay to do it. The fastest is just to loop. –  Chris McCauley Oct 23 '09 at 16:03
    
Hmmm... I guess it doesn't return a new array. Let me edit it. –  CookieOfFortune Oct 23 '09 at 16:30
    
@Chris: Of course a loop would be the faster, but why not just write it in ASM while we're at it too? –  CookieOfFortune Oct 23 '09 at 16:34
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For the record:

a = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
h = Hash[*a]
evens = h.keys
odds = h.values

I'm using the 'splat' operator of Array to get comma separated values and pass that to Hash which accepts arguments as alternating keys/values.

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1  
it doesn't work if a.size is odd –  sheerun Nov 14 '13 at 23:12
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Another way to think about it (adds array2 evens to array1):

array1 << array2.values_at(*Array.new(array2.size/2){|i| i*2})
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This seems like the most Rubyish solution, combining the best of JacobM and glenn jackman's approaches.

module ::Enumerable
  def select_with_index
    index = -1
    select { |x| yield(x, (index += 1)) }
  end
  def odds
    select_with_index {|x,i| i.odd?}
  end
  def evens
    select_with_index {|x,i| i.even?}
  end
end
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Here's a code snippet that's intended to add a select_with_index method to Enumerable, which would allow you to do

array.select_with_index{|item, i| item if i % 2 == 0} for evens

array.select_with_index{|item, i| item if i % 2 == 1} for odds

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1  
you could use if i.even? and if i.odd? –  glenn jackman Oct 23 '09 at 16:56
    
that (block_given? && self.class == Range || self.class == Array) stuff in that snippet is nuts. Why not just select { |x| index += 1; yield(x, index) } ? –  AlexChaffee Aug 25 '12 at 4:39
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My take on the problem, defining simple Array extensions:

class Array
  def odd_values
    (0...length / 2).collect { |i| self[i*2 + 1] }
  end

  def even_values
    (0...(length + 1) / 2).collect { |i| self[i*2] }
  end
end

puts [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ].odd_values.inspect
# => [1, 3, 5, 7, 9]

puts [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ].even_values.inspect
# => [0, 2, 4, 6, 8]

puts [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ].even_values.inspect
# => [0, 2, 4, 6, 8]

puts [ ].even_values.inspect
# => []
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This might work for you, or then again, not :-)

irb(main):050:0> all = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
irb(main):051:0> evens = []
=> []
irb(main):052:0> all.each_index do |i| if (i.even?): evens.push(a[i]) end end
=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
irb(main):053:0> evens
=> [1, 3, 5, 7, 9]
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1  
(i.even?): -> (i.even?); –  regedarek Mar 11 '12 at 13:22
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a = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]

(1...a.size).step(2).collect { |i| a[i] }
=> [1, 3, 5, 7, 9]

(2...a.size).step(2).collect { |i| a[i] }
=> [2, 4, 6, 8]

Of course, considering 0 an odd index creates a little hackery, right? Since you will have adjacent entries that are in effect odd indicies. To compensate for that you can just add the zeroth entry to the result of the first collect. Consider:

[a[0]] + (1...a.size).step(2).collect { |i| a[i] }
=> [0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9]

You could always compact this further and do something like:

a.values_at(*(1...a.size).step(2))
=> [1, 3, 5, 7, 9]

a.values_at(*(2...a.size).step(2))
=> [2, 4, 6, 8]

The same hack is available to handle the zeroth entry.

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1  
Why would you want 0 to be odd? 0 is even! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parity_of_zero –  James McKinney Sep 27 '12 at 18:40
1  
Because it was a requirement in the original request? –  ezpz Sep 28 '12 at 0:25
    
Aha, I missed that. Thanks. –  James McKinney Sep 28 '12 at 4:34
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evens = (1..10).each_with_object([]) {|i, a| a << i*2 }
#=> [2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20]
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a = [1,2,3,4,5]
a.in_groups_of(2).map(&:first) => odds
a.in_groups_of(2).map(&:last) => evens
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in_groups_of is in Rails only. But each_slice in the Ruby standard library is equivalent here. So write a.each_slice(2).map(&:first). –  Rory O'Kane Jul 1 '13 at 21:04
1  
Note that “odds” in this answer (odd numbers in the array a) means the values at even indexes, and “evens” means values at odd indexes. –  Rory O'Kane Jul 1 '13 at 21:13
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odds = array.each_slice(2).map(&:first)
evens = array.each_slice(2).map(&:last)
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1  
Close, except doesn't handle an array with an odd length. [1,3,4].each_slice(2).map(&:last) returns [3,4] but we want [3]. –  Brian Morearty Jan 16 '13 at 22:34
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left,right = a.partition.each_with_index{ |el, i| i.even? }
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module Enumerable
  def odd_values
    r = []
    self.each_index {|x| r << self[x] if x%2==0}
    r
  end
end

p ["a", "b" ,"c" ,"d" ,"e"].odd_values  #returns ["a","c","e"]
p ["a", "b" ,"c" ,"d" ,"e"].odd_values.join("-") #returns "a-c-e"

I just reused an approach i used for another question on arrays. :D

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Don't forget good old friend Array.inject

a = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
a.inject([]){|result, item| result << item if item %2 == 1; result}

Should give you odd items.

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With a blank array A, and a full array H, something like this should work:

H.size.times do |i|
  if i % 2 == 1
    A[i/2] = H[i]
  end
end
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