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I have a data that looks like this (adjacency matrix):

foo bar 0.14 qux 0.2
bar foo 0.14 qux 0.4
qux foo 0.2 bar 0.4

What I want to do is to convert them into pairwise table:

  foo bar 0.14
  foo qux 0.2
  bar qux 0.4

But I'm stuck with the following code. What's the correct way to do it?

   use strict;

   while ( <DATA> ) {
        chomp;
        next if (/^>/);
        my $line = $_;
        my @els = split(/\s+/,$line);
        my $pivot = $els[0];

        my $genen = '';
        my $score = '';

        foreach  my $id ( 0 .. $#els  ) {
            next if ($id == 0);
            if ( $id % 2 != 0 ) {
                # gene name
                #print "$els[$id]\n";
                $genen = $els[$id];

            }
            else {
                #
                $score = $els[$id];
            }

    print "$pivot   $genen  $score\n";

        }

    #print "--\n";

    }
__DATA__
foo bar 0.3 qux 0.2
bar foo 0.15 qux 0.4
qux foo 0.3 bar 0.4
share|improve this question
    
Surely the weight of 0.3 is a typo for 0.14, right? –  sehe Apr 22 '13 at 8:02
    
yes. Corrected. Thanks –  neversaint Apr 22 '13 at 8:04
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Updated in response to comments

Here's a simplified version that would appear to be more self-explanatory, and a little bit more robust:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

sub transpose
{
    my $pivot =  shift || die "pivot required";
    while (my ($genen, $score) = (shift, shift))
    {
        last unless $score and $genen;
        print "$pivot   $genen  $score\n";
    }
}

for (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    transpose(split /\s+/) unless m/^>/;
}
__DATA__
foo bar 0.3 qux 0.2
bar foo 0.15 qux 0.4
qux foo 0.3 bar 0.4

Output:

foo   bar  0.3
foo   qux  0.2
bar   foo  0.15
bar   qux  0.4
qux   foo  0.3
qux   bar  0.4
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I the following data (just one line): dpaste.com/1068656/plain ; But somehow my algo failed... For example I expect it not to print 'Unigene14119_All Unigene39653_All 0.234869' –  neversaint Apr 22 '13 at 8:14
    
yes. just single line. Data is too large to include all. I just show first line. –  neversaint Apr 22 '13 at 8:18
1  
@neversaint I have taken the test data to produce a more legible, simpler version, and updated my answer. Hope you like it. –  sehe Apr 22 '13 at 8:29
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awk '{print $1,$2,$3} {print $1,$4,$5}' file
share|improve this answer
    
I'm afraid it doesn't scale so well for the OP's real data sample –  sehe Apr 22 '13 at 21:24
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