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I'm assuming I'm getting this error because I'm reading the same CSV twice (I don't fully understand why this is an issue tho) but I need the code below to do the following 2 things...

1) Give me a the total count of all the rows in the CSV.

2) Give me the first two lines only of the data for me to display back to the user.

file = upload.filepath
#I READ THE FILE
file_read = csv.reader(file)

#GET THE COUNT I.E. 100 ROWS
row_count = sum(1 for row in file_read)

#ADD TO DATA JUST THE FIRST TWO ROWS THAT I WILL USE TO DISPLAY BACK TO THE USER
data = []
for i in range(2):
    data.append(file_read.next())

How can I achieve this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why not reverse the two statements? You can read the first two lines in using your:

#ADD TO DATA JUST THE FIRST TWO ROWS THAT I WILL USE TO DISPLAY BACK TO THE USER
data = []
for i in range(2):
    data.append(file_read.next())

Then do the row count for the remaining rows, and add 2:

#GET THE COUNT I.E. 100 ROWS
row_count = 2 + sum(1 for row in file_read)

However, will give incorrect results if you have <2 rows. A better solution may be to simply read in the whole file, then count the rows in the resulting list.

import csv

# Open the file upload.filepath, get a pointer in file
# file automatically closed at end of 'with' context
with open(upload.filepath, 'r') as file:

    #I READ THE FILE
    file_read = csv.reader(file)

    data = []
    for row in file_read:
        data.append(row)

    rows = len(data)
    first_two_rows = data[:2]

If it's a massive file, and your worried about memory, you can add a count variable, and only append to data when its <=2

data = []
rows = 0
for row in file_read:
    rows += 1
    if rows<3:
        data.append(row)
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Nice solution @mfitzp thanks for taking the time to explain too. –  GrantU Apr 22 '13 at 10:12
1  
last question do I need to close the file? –  GrantU Apr 22 '13 at 10:12
    
Yes, good point, although the way you're opening it here doesn't allow for that. You need to open it first to get a file pointer, then close that pointer. You can also use with open as f syntax, which is more concise and avoids manual closing. I'll update my answer with an example. –  mfitzp Apr 22 '13 at 20:49
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Using islice you can do:

from itertools import islice
import csv

with open('somefile') as fin:
    csvin = csv.reader(fin)
    firstn = list(islice(csvin, 2))
    rows = len(firstn) + sum(1 for row in csvin)

This saves you having to read the file and then seek to the start, and will correctly return the number of rows, and the file will automatically be closed afterwards or in case of an exception.

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You should do the following:

f = open('test.csv')

reader = csv.reader(f)
row_count = sum(1 for each in reader)

f.seek(0)  #reposition

data = []
for i in range(2):
    data.append(reader.next())

f.close()
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I get No exception supplied at this line: data.append(reader.next()) –  GrantU Apr 22 '13 at 10:06
    
Sorry, I didn't get what you mean by No exception supplied. –  akshar Apr 22 '13 at 10:11
    
sorry not related, my bad –  GrantU Apr 22 '13 at 10:22
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