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Is it possible to add trailing zero's to a value with regular expression. The following figures shows what I want.

1
1.2
1.23
1.231

Expected result

1000
1200
1230
1231

Within in Java it's no issue but with RegularExpression I don't know if this is even possible. Please any advise. Regards Dirk

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4  
Why do you want to use regex to do it ? – ibi0tux Apr 22 '13 at 8:51
4  
Why use a regex when multiplying by 1000 will give you the results you want? – Vimal Stan Apr 22 '13 at 8:52
2  
The question depends a bit on what you mean by "regular expressions". In some kind sense regular expressions are only for matching, which means that any rewriting depends a lot on the tool used. But, in general anything that requires arithmetic in programming will be tricky in regular expressions. However, as long as the arithmetic has a finite number of cases you can just enumerate the cases. – leijon Apr 22 '13 at 8:53
    
Within the processing of the figures I only have the possibility to use regular expressions. This is how the application is designed. I can't change that process. The regular expression is used within "servingxml". – Dirk Apr 22 '13 at 8:56
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is not possible only with regular expressions, as you can't generate content.

However, you can get the different digits with (\d)\.(\d?)(\d?)(\d?) and then display there a 0, where its no digit in.

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The following may not be an elegant solution, but it'll work; it has been tested in Notepad++.

  1. Replace ^(\d*)\.?(\d*)$ with ($1$2)0000000000. This adds a "maximum" number of zeros to the numbers.
  2. Replace ^(\d{4}).*$ with $1.

For the input:

1
1.2
1.23
1.231

Step 1 yields:

10000000000
120000000000
1230000000000
12310000000000

Now, step 2 yields:

1000
1200
1230
1231
share|improve this answer
    
Good point. However, if you input 12.34 and 1.234 this would both return 1234. And (although this is not a requirement of the original question) this might be a problem. – Itchy Apr 22 '13 at 9:12
    
@Itchy: Yeah; I'm not sure what the OP is looking for though. – Roney Michael Apr 22 '13 at 10:33
    
This is no problem as long as the contract is clear. The contract states that the last 3 digits are fractions. – Dirk Apr 22 '13 at 14:01

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