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My program is a simple web scraper, should I deplot it with a manifest?

When I right click the properties in the SOlution Explorer, I see the change icon option, and also the Manifest option.

Can I just disable that by choosing: Create an application without a manifest.

Should I disable it?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

As long as you are not using the manifest file for dependencies or elevating privileges you can bypass the manifest file.

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A manifest file provides certain features to an application. Including (but not limited to the following)

  • UAC related elevation requests
  • Private probing path assignments
  • Assembly Redirection
    • This can be very useful for administrators to change assembly bindings on a deployed application without needing a recompile

If you are not using any of the features provided by a manifest then it's not strictly necessary and can be deleted. However it also doesn't really negatively affect your application so why go through the trouble?

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I don't think you should disable it without a good reason to. A Manifest provides some useful meta information about the assembly, and I believe it can carry dependencies as well.

There's also the support risk. Lets say next year you decided to add some new features that need the manifest to work correctly. Everything assumes the manifest is in place, so it will break it odd ways that no one could explain, at least until you remember what had been done before.

The overhead of the manifest is low enough that leaving it there costs you next to nothing. Leave it in place.

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