Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am a complete beginner at C++ and what might seem stupidly obvious to you I just cannot get my head around.

Testapp.h

#ifndef TESTAPP_H
#define TESTAPP_H
using namespace std;
class Testapp {
private: 
public:
Testapp() { };   
};
#endif

main.cpp

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include "Testapp.h"
Testapp::Testapp(){
}
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
system("PAUSE");
return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Error Message: Redefinition of 'Testapp::Testapp()'

At a guess it's defining the constructor twice, how to overcome this though I am not sure. I am using DEV-C++.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by BЈовић, Bo Persson, TemplateRex, Simon O'Hanlon, keyboardsurfer Apr 22 '13 at 11:30

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A function declaration is also a definition when it gives the implementation or body of the function. You have a definition of the constructor in your class definition that looks like this:

Testapp() { };  

It's body is { } and is empty. Then you have another definition in your main.cpp file that looks like this:

Testapp::Testapp(){
}

Again, this function definition has an empty body. Just because the function implementations are exactly the same, it doesn't mean it's okay. Under the one definition rule, you must not have multiple definitions of a function. An easy fix is to make the one in the class definition only a declaration by not providing a body:

Testapp();

Alternatively, you could just get rid of the definition in main.cpp entirely. Exactly what you end up doing depends on how you want to lay out your code. A typical approach is to have a header file containing the class definition and member function declarations, Testapp.h:

#ifndef TESTAPP_H
#define TESTAPP_H
using namespace std;
class Testapp {
private: 
public:
Testapp(); // Just a declaration
};
#endif

Then in an implementation file for this class, Testapp.cpp, give the member function definitions:

#include "Testapp.h"

Testapp::Testapp() { }

Then in main.cpp, just include the header file and use the class it defines:

#include "Testapp.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  Testapp test;
  return 0;
}

I recommend removing the using namespace std; from your header file. It's considered pretty bad practise even in source files for polluting your global namespace, but this becomes positively infectious if you do it in your header file.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks man, that solved almost all errors in my other program. Very well explained - just have one error left in my main program now! undefined reference to WinMain@16. grr! I just removed the body like you told me to. Thanks for the tip on the namespace too, I will definitely look at removing that. –  Zakerias Apr 22 '13 at 12:26

In your header file, you only want to write a function "stub", or function prototype:

class Testapp {
  private: 
  public:
  Testapp();   
};

You need to learn the difference between function declarations (prototypes) and function definitions in C++.

share|improve this answer

You have already defined Testapp::Testapp in your class declaration

Testapp() { };   

You need to either remove

Testapp::Testapp(){
}

Or change constructor definition to declaration

Testapp();   
share|improve this answer

It's indeed defined twice - once in the Testapp.h and once in the main.cpp, just remove one of them.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.