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Hello I am using the %dopar% parallel functionality of the foreach package (parallel as the backend) I have a line of code like this

exportedFn <- #STUFF
exportedPkg <- #STUFF
allDataT <- foreach(myFile=orderFiles, .combine='rbind', .packages=exportedPkg, .export=exportedFn) %dopar% getSetOrderData(myFile, f.type="SUBMIT");

The problem is that getSetOrderData calls differnet functions, those functions themselves call functions. It looks like I have to specify ALL SUBFUNCTIONS...

Is there a way for me to avoid doing this ?

share|improve this question
    
Put all functions in a package? – Roland Apr 22 '13 at 9:59
    
:) come'on @Rolland doing this is a lot of work, surely there is something simpler like exporting an environment or... – statquant Apr 22 '13 at 10:02
    
Where are these functions defined? Presumably not packages, because you're handling them via "exportedPkg". Are they all in .GlobalEnv, or somewhere else? – Steve Weston Apr 22 '13 at 16:40
    
Hello @SteveWeston, they are defined in the same script, so they are in .GlobalEnv, yes. Additionally I had to export a global variable (assigned by <<-), I would have guessed it would be known everywhere too – statquant Apr 22 '13 at 16:56
    
If foreach is executed from .GlobalEnv and getSetOrderData is defined in .GlobalEnv, then any functions called by getSetOrderData that are also defined in .GlobalEnv should be auto-exported, as @SimonO101 said. If not, then it sounds like a bug to me. Could you post a reproducible example? – Steve Weston Apr 22 '13 at 17:33
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Make sure all variables are defined in the same environment as getSetOrderData? I find that if I define

fsub <- function( x ){
  return( x^2 )
}

fmain <- function( x ){
  x <- fsub( x ) + 2
  return(x)
}

And then I use them thus:

require(doParallel)
cl <- makeCluster( 2 , outfile = "" )
registerDoParallel( cl )
foreach( k = 1:2 , .verbose = TRUE , .combine = c ) %dopar%{
  fmain( k )
}

I get results as I expected:

numValues: 2, numResults: 0, stopped: TRUE
automatically exporting the following variables from the local environment:
  fmain, fsub 
got results for task 1
numValues: 2, numResults: 1, stopped: TRUE
returning status FALSE
got results for task 2
numValues: 2, numResults: 2, stopped: TRUE
first call to combine function
evaluating call object to combine results:
  fun(result.1, result.2)
returning status TRUE
[1] 3 6

And further, if I call the functions - which are not otherwise defined inside the .GlobalEnv- inside another function using source() it still works. Let's say I make a script called util_funcs.R inside my home directory and paste those two functions in, but call them fsub2 and fmain2. If I call it in the following way:

fsource <- function( x ){
  source( "~/util_funcs.R" )
  x <- fmain2( x )
  return( x )
}

It still works:

numValues: 2, numResults: 0, stopped: TRUE
automatically exporting the following variables from the local environment:
  fsource 
got results for task 1
numValues: 2, numResults: 1, stopped: TRUE
returning status FALSE
got results for task 2
numValues: 2, numResults: 2, stopped: TRUE
first call to combine function
evaluating call object to combine results:
  fun(result.1, result.2)
returning status TRUE
[1] 3 6

Can you just copy/paste all the functions in a simple R script and use source()?

share|improve this answer
    
Rather than calling source from the task function (which may be called many times), I would initialize the workers with clusterEvalQ(cl,source("~/util_funcs.R")). It's more efficient and the functions are available for any number of foreach loops. – Steve Weston Apr 23 '13 at 16:19

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