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I found out that some websites use css tag like style.css?ver=1. What is this??

What is purpose of ?ver=1 How do I do it in code?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 20 down vote accepted

To avoid caching of CSS.
If the website updates their CSS they update the ver to a higher number, therefore browser is forced to get a new file and not use cached previous version.
Otherwise a browser may get a new HTML code and old CSS and some elements of the website may look broken.

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1  
as an added note, you can add the timestamp of the request instead of a version number and completely bypass caching of the stylesheet altogether. This increases processing, but reduces code maintenance. –  Jim Schubert Oct 23 '09 at 16:34
    
Agree with Jim, I use file's timestamp personally and it is much easier to use. –  Michal M Oct 23 '09 at 16:58
    
Do I not understand, or are you suggesting to use timestamps to prevent cache, which was introduced to reduce server load, in order to diminish programming? –  Kheldar Nov 7 '11 at 15:40
    
I definitely don't want to diminish programming. Using file's timestamp is not aimed to disable cache completely. It's to tell browsers use current version of file and cache it. If you update your CSS file, it's timestamp updates and browsers should serve new file. –  Michal M Nov 7 '11 at 15:57
    
Is it just because browser won't cache a parametrized query or we can actually insert a version number in CSS and can call it by the number e.g. ver=1, ver=2, ver=3, or call an older version while a newer one exists? –  bjan Sep 23 '13 at 6:18

Adding '?ver=1' makes the HTTP request look like a GET query with parameters, and well-behaved browsers (and proxies) will refuse to cache parameterized queries. Of course well-behaved browsers (and proxies) should also pay attention to the 'Cache-control: no-cache', 'Expires', 'Last-Modified', and 'ETag' response headers (all of which were added to HTTP to specify correct caching behavior).

The '?ver=1' method is an expensive way to force behavior when the site developer doesn't know how (or is too lazy) to implement the correct response headers. In particular, it means that every page request is going to force requesting that CSS file, even though, in practice, CSS files change rarely, if at all.

My recommendation? Don't do it.

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"it means that every page request is going to force requesting that CSS file" - no it doesn't. Why would it? Simply because the query part of the resource is used? –  bzlm Jul 5 '11 at 14:42
1  
Don't believe me? Test it with a variety of browsers. –  Craig Trader Jul 18 '11 at 14:43
    
Is it just because browser won't cache a parametrized query or we can actually insert a version number in CSS and can call it by the number e.g. ver=1, ver=2, ver=3, or call an older version while a newer one exists? –  bjan Sep 23 '13 at 6:19
    
It's because browsers won't cache parameterized queries. –  Craig Trader Oct 27 '13 at 20:28

The purpose of the ?ver=1 is to parameterize the css file, so when they publish a new style.css file they up the version and it forces the client to download the new file, instead of pulling from the cached version.

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I think that ?ver=1 is for the version no. of the web app. Every time a new build is created, the app can update the ver to the new version. This is so that the browser will load the new CSS file and not use the cached one (both use different file names).

You can refer to this site: http://www.knowlegezone.com/36/article/Technology/Software/JavaScript/CSS-Caching-Hack----javascript-as-well

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If you are developing a web application in HTML and CSS or any other technology, and you are using some external CSS or JS files, you might notice one thing that in some cases if you made any changes to your existing .css or .js files then the browsers are not reflecting the changes immediately.

What happens in that case is that the browser do not download a fresh copy of the latest version of the .css and .js files, instead it uses those files stored in your local cache. As a result the changes you made recently are not visible to you.

<link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css?v=1.1"> 

The above case when you load the web page the browser will treat "style.css" as a different file along with "?v=1.1". Hence the browser is forced to download a fresh copy if the stylesheet or the script file.

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IMO a better way to do this would be to include a hash generated off of the file size or a checksum based on the file contents or last-modified date. That way you don't have to update some version number and just let the number be driven off of the file's changing properties.

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