Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the difference between using c() and append()? Is there any?

> c(      rep(0,5), rep(3,2) )
[1] 0 0 0 0 0 3 3

> append( rep(0,5), rep(3,2) )
[1] 0 0 0 0 0 3 3
share|improve this question
1  
c is also a primitive with several S3 methods (see methods("c")) –  baptiste Apr 22 '13 at 12:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The way you've used it doesn't show difference between c and append. append is different in the sense that it allows for values to be inserted into a vector after a certain position.

Example:

x <- c(10,8,20)
c(x, 6) # always adds to the end
# [1] 10 8 20 6
append(x, 6, after = 2)
# [1] 10  8  6 20

If you type append in R terminal, you'll see that it uses c() to append values.

# append function
function (x, values, after = length(x)) 
{
    lengx <- length(x)
    if (!after) 
        c(values, x)
    # by default after = length(x) which just calls a c(x, values)
    else if (after >= lengx) 
        c(x, values)
    else c(x[1L:after], values, x[(after + 1L):lengx])
}

You can see (the commented part) that by default (if you don't set after= as in your example), it simply returns c(x, values). c is a more generic function that can concatenate values to vectors or lists.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for showing the source. Always gives more insight into R. –  Nishanth Apr 22 '13 at 10:38
    
!after is TRUE is after is 0, and FALSE otherwise. It's nothing to do with whether after is set or not. –  hadley Apr 22 '13 at 12:05
    
thanks, corrected. –  Arun Apr 22 '13 at 12:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.