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Why syscall read() is slower than getc() function?

for (;;) {
        chr++;
        amr=read(file1, &wc1, 1);
        amr2=read(file2, &wc2, 1);
        if (wc1 == wc2) {
            if (wc1 == '\n')
                line++;
            if (amr == 0) {
                if (eflg)
                    return (1);
                return (0);
            }
            continue;
        }

is slower than

for (;;) {
    chr++;
    c1 = getc(file1);
    c2 = getc(file2);
    if (c1 == c2) {
        if (c1 == '\n')
            line++;
        if (c1 == EOF) {
            if (eflg)
                return (1);
            return (0);
        }
        continue;
    }

when getc() call it uses read() system call, so why is slower?

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2  
How did you determine that it's slower? –  Konstantin D - Infragistics Apr 22 '13 at 11:26
10  
double –  Eddy_Em Apr 22 '13 at 11:26
3  
Because not buffering –  BLUEPIXY Apr 22 '13 at 11:26
    
in file that have 7 878 999 chars(bytes) getc() code works in 3x faster –  Nat Kup Apr 22 '13 at 11:28
2  
@NatKup A buffer is a temporary place to store the characters. Say your buffer is 1000 characters big, then the first call to getc reads 1000 characters and fills the buffer with them. The next 999 calls to getc don't do any reading, they just get one character from the buffer so they are very fast. The 1001th call to getc will then fill the buffer again, and so it repeats. –  john Apr 22 '13 at 11:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

read() involves context switch to kernel, which is relatively slow. When you use it directly and read one byte at a time, you have many context switches. But when you use getc(), it will call read() once for 4 or 8 kB and than return the characters from that without further context switches until it exhausts the buffer.

If you use read() with larger buffer, it would be faster than getc(), because the generic buffering of standard C library has some overhead.

(Edit) Note, that disks can only be read in blocks that are 512 bytes for all generally used storage media. So there has to be some buffering in the kernel anyway. And because memory is allocated in pages of 4096 bytes, most systems (Linux certainly does) read at least that much with each request to the physical storage. But the context switch is also expensive, so the additional layer of buffering in userland still saves a lot of time. This buffering is used in all libc IO, which includes everything using FILE* (the buffer is part of the FILE structure), so fread() will be faster than read() for small reads.

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Answer #1: It isn't slower.

Answer #2: It depends.

You don't want to make a syscall (which includes a context switch on memory-protected systems) for every byte you read from the file. You would, on the first byte-sized access, read an appropriate amount of data (say 4k) into memory, and serve the first byte to the caller. On subsequent byte-sized reads, you don't have to call the kernel or actually access the file at all; you simply pass the next byte from the buffer until you have to read another 4k block.

This is what the standard C library's calls (fread(), fgetc(), fgets() etc. etc.) do by default. You can check BUFSIZ to get the default buffer size. You can change the buffer size, or disable buffering altogether, via the setvbuf() call.

read() is not part of the standard C library, it is a POSIX syscall. Basically, it is the backend for the standard C library calls on POSIX systems. (On a Windows system, fgetc() would call the Win32 API instead.) As such, read() doesn't buffer, and calling it for byte-sized chunks is inefficient as hell. If you call read(), you usually do so because you want to do the buffering yourself.

Generally speaking, don't mix POSIX and standard library I/O calls. Use the POSIX API for low-level access, use the standard library for portable convenience (and good default performance).

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