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I'm new to jquery and trying to accomplish something. My HTML looks like:

<li>
  <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Group 1"></div>
  <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Group 1"></div>
  Group 1  
  <ul>
    <li style="padding-left:25px">
      <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 1"></div>
      <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item 1"></div>
      Item 1
    </li>
    <li style="padding-left:25px">
      <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 2"></div>
      <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item 2"></div>
      Item 2
    </li>
  </ul>
</li>
<li>
  <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Group 2"></div>
  <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Group 2"></div>
  Group 2  
  <ul>
    <li style="padding-left:25px">
      <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 3"></div>
      <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item 3"></div>
      Item 3
    </li>
    <li style="padding-left:25px">
      <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 4"></div>
      <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item 4"></div>
      Item 4
    </li>
  </ul>
</li>

It took a while to get the html right (I need the divs around the radio buttons for appearances), and now I'm moving on to the JQuery processing. Primarily, I need to propagate changes to Group 1 to all of its "child" items. I'm not really sure how to accomplish that using jquery (we use 1.1.3.1).

Any tips?

UPDATE: I edited the HTML as suggested, cordoning off the groups.

share|improve this question
    
AAAHHH!!! For starters, update to the latest version of jQuery! –  Matt Ball Oct 23 '09 at 17:11
    
@Matt Ball: lol, if it was my decision, it would be done. I can't even convince our leadership to upgrade from 3.0 to 3.5. Explain that one! –  JustLoren Oct 23 '09 at 17:12
1  
heh is it possible to use the jQuery.noConflict support to load another version of jQuery alongside the 'official supported' one your leadership requires to be present? –  Ty W Oct 23 '09 at 17:15
    
@Ty W: Not sure if that's the correct solution, after looking at what .noConflict does. It seems to just disassociate jQuery with the $() shortcut. Not sure how that ensures that I get the newer version. Also, I doubt leadership will buy into supporting two diff versions anymore than they'll buy into upgrading. :'( –  JustLoren Oct 23 '09 at 17:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDITED: Changed some code, damn old jquery.

First off, your radios have no values. That's going to be a fly in your ointment, since they're both the same.

For your HTML, I would do:

<li class="group" id="group1">
    <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="group1" value="yes"></div>
    <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="group1" value="no"></div>
    Group 1  
    <ul>
        <li>
        <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item1" value="yes"></div>
        <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item1" value="no"></div>
        Item 1
        </li>

        <li style="padding-left:25px">
        <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item2" value="yes"></div>
        <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item2" value="no"></div>
        Item 2
        </li>
    </ul>
</li>

The extra serves the dual functions of delimiting the subgroups in a logical way, and providing a nice hook. Instead of setting the padding as a style, do li ul li{ padding-left: 25px;}

Then, you can do

        $(document).ready(function(){
            $(".group>div>input").change(function(){
                val = $(".group>div>input:checked").val();
                var inputs = $(this).parents("li").find("ul li div input[@value="+val+"]");
                inputs.each(function(){$(this).attr("checked","checked")});
            });
        });

This will trigger the inside function on a change in one of the group 1 inputs.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is there are some <li>s further up in the hierarchy of the page, so .parents("li") winds up setting everything. Plus, your val = statement would only select the first group. I fixed it all by changing to val = $(this).parent().parent().find(...) and var inputs = jQuery(this).parent().parent().find(...) Thanks for all the help! –  JustLoren Oct 23 '09 at 18:20
    
Could someone clear up whether my "fix" is a hack or is the correct way of doing it? –  JustLoren Oct 23 '09 at 18:28
    
When in doubt, add some descriptive classnames. That way you can use something like .parents("li.group"). That way you're defended if you have to change the nesting levels. –  Adam Bard Oct 23 '09 at 20:31
$("div") => Selects all div elements
$(".yes") => Selects all elements which have class name "yes"
$("#elementId") => Selects element which Id value is "elementId"

$("div .yes") =>Selects elements under div element (all the descendants) and have class name "yes"

$("div > .yes") =>Selects elements right under div elements. Not all descendants, just direct children

Hope it helps.

For example $("li div[class=yes] input") will select :

<div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Group 1"></div>
<div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 1"></div>
<div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 2"></div>
<div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Group 2"></div>
<div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Group 5"></div>
<div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 3"></div>
<div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 4"></div>

For more information, you can check jQuery Selectors : http://docs.jquery.com/Selectors

or The best book is jQuery in Action, well I am learning from this book :)

Select sibling elements of li : $("li")

P.s : In normal javascript $() means getElementById() but it works a little bit different in jQuery because jQuery power comes from its selectors, it uses Css selectors as well as its own custom and powerful selectors.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time to write a response! Unfortunately, I think this is more general-purpose info regarding jquery than an answer to my specific problem. I've tried a lot of different selector types and have (thus far) been unable to select just Item 1 and Item 2 after clicking on Group 1. –  JustLoren Oct 23 '09 at 17:19

The problem I see with the markup that makes it hard for you to select "child" elements is that the Items are on the same hierarchical level as the Group items.

Visually, you were able to distinguish the parent (Group) from the children (Item) by giving the children padding. Is there a reason why they're on the same level?

To keep your mark-up semantic, and to more easily do what you're trying to do, I suggest changing your structure as such:

<li>
    <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Group 1"></div>
    <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Group 1"></div>
    Group 1
    <ul>
    	<li style="padding-left:25px">
    		<div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 1"></div>
    		<div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item 1"></div>
    		Item 1
    	</li>
    	<li style="padding-left:25px">
    		<div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 2"></div>
    		<div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item 2"></div>
    		Item 2
    	</li>
    </ul>  
</li>
share|improve this answer

Give each of your group 1 children a class called "group1" or something that distinguish it from the rest of the other items in the other groups. Or put a container around the group1 items like a or .

Then add a click event handler to the Group 1 radio button so that when they click "yes", then select all the radio buttons inside the "yes" classes that are inside your container class.

<li>
  <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Group 1"></div>
  <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Group 1"></div>
  Group 1  
</li>
<li class="group1" style="padding-left:25px">
  <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 1"></div>
  <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item 1"></div>
  Item 1
</li>
<li class="group1" style="padding-left:25px">
  <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 2"></div>
  <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item 2"></div>
  Item 2
</li>
<li>
  <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Group 2"></div>
  <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Group 2"></div>
  Group 2  
</li>
<li class="group2" style="padding-left:25px">
  <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 3"></div>
  <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item 3"></div>
  Item 3
</li>
<li class="group2" style="padding-left:25px">
  <div class="yes"><input type="radio" name="Item 4"></div>
  <div class="no"><input type="radio" name="Item 4"></div>
  Item 4
</li>

To check off all the "yes" buttons in group 1, you can do:

$(".group1 > .yes").children().val("true");

or something like that, I can't remember what the syntax is to check the radio box but that's the idea.

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