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I almost understand why this particular problem arises (though I more than welcome a layman's explanation if you can find the time!), it I'm sure involves boxing/unboxing which I won't attempt to incorrectly explain..

With my current knowledge (or lack thereof), of the situation, I'm not sure how best to proceed to resolve it.

Here is a fairly simplified console app showing my issue:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    try
    {
        // succeeds
        IEnumerable<Expression<Func<TestCase1Impl, dynamic>>> results1 =
            typeof(ITestCase1).GetMethods().Select(m => buildDynamicExpression(new TestCase1Impl(), m));
        Console.WriteLine("{0} methods processed on ITestCase1", results1.Count().ToString());

        // succeeds
        IEnumerable<Expression<Func<TestCase2Impl, int>>> results2 =
            typeof(ITestCase2).GetMethods().Select(m => buildTypedExpression(new TestCase2Impl(), m));
        Console.WriteLine("{0} methods processed on ITestCase2", results2.Count().ToString());

        // fails
        IEnumerable<Expression<Func<TestCase2Impl, dynamic>>> results3 =
            typeof(ITestCase2).GetMethods().Select(m => buildDynamicExpression(new TestCase2Impl(), m));
        Console.WriteLine("{0} methods processed on ITestCase2", results3.Count().ToString());
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Failed: {0}", ex.ToString());
    }

    Console.ReadKey();
}

private static Expression<Func<T, dynamic>> buildDynamicExpression<T>(T arg, MethodInfo method)
{
    ParameterExpression param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T));
    MethodCallExpression[] args = new MethodCallExpression[0]; // none of the methods shown take arguments
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, dynamic>>(Expression.Call(param, method, args), new ParameterExpression[] { param });
}

private static Expression<Func<T, int>> buildTypedExpression<T>(T arg, MethodInfo method)
{
    ParameterExpression param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T));
    MethodCallExpression[] args = new MethodCallExpression[0]; // none of the methods shown take arguments
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, int>>(Expression.Call(param, method, args), new ParameterExpression[] { param });
}

public interface ITestCase1
{
    string Method1();

    List<int> Method2();

    Program Method3();
}

public interface ITestCase2
{
    int Method4();
}

private class TestCase1Impl : ITestCase1
{
    public string Method1()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public List<int> Method2()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public Program Method3()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

private class TestCase2Impl : ITestCase2
{
    public int Method4()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

The above will output

3 methods processed on ITestCase1
1 methods processed on ITestCase2
Failed: System.ArgumentException: Expression of type 'System.Int32' cannot be used for return type 'System.Object' <irrelevant stack trace follows>

As is often the case with these issues, it's better to examine where it was you started before getting into this terrible mess.

I'm using Moq. I have a common interface used widely across my application by other interfaces. I have a need to test that my interface consumers first call a particular method on the common interface, before calling any methods on the various interfaces (this to me sounds like a bad design in hindsight, I may address that later but for purely academic reasons, I'd like to solve this issue first).

In order to this, I dynamically generate expressions for each method on my interfaces with It.IsAny<T>() arguments, which I can then pass to a mock.Setup(generatedExpression).Callback(doSomethingCommonHere).

It may well be that there is a easier way to do this instead of my expression building...?

If not however, my question is, what is the best way to amend my expression building to allow for value types?

share|improve this question
1  
Indeed, it is a bad design decision to enforce the call to a Initialize method of some sort. It is called temporal coupling and Mark Seemann has an article about it: blog.ploeh.dk/2011/05/24/DesignSmellTemporalCoupling –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 22 '13 at 14:31
    
Thanks for the link. I'll set about fixing the temporal coupling now I know what it's called. :) –  Smudge202 Apr 22 '13 at 14:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This isn't specific to dynamic. You will get the same result if you replace dynamic with object. You would even get that for custom value types that implement an interface and you want to return them from a Func<IImplementedInterface>.
The reason for this is the fact that when you want to return an int as object it has to be boxed - as you correctly guessed.
The expression that is used for boxing is Expression.Convert. Adding that to your code will fix the exception:

private static Expression<Func<T, dynamic>> BuildDynamicExpression<T>(
    T arg,
    MethodInfo method)
{
    ParameterExpression param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T));
    var methodCall = Expression.Call(param, method);
    var conversion = 
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, dynamic>>(
        Expression.Convert(methodCall, typeof(object)),
        new ParameterExpression[] { param });
}

BTW: As you can see, I removed the args array. It is not necessary.


To work around the problem with Moq I think you need to change the approach a bit.
The idea is the following:

  • Create an expression with the exact return type of the called method.
  • Let the DLR (Dynamic Language Runtime) figure out the type of the expression.

In Code:

IEnumerable<Expression> results =
    typeof(ITestCase2).GetMethods()
                      .Select(m => BuildDynamicExpression(
                                       new TestCase2Impl(), m));

BuildDynamicExpression looks like this:

private static Expression BuildDynamicExpression<T>(T arg, MethodInfo method)
{
    ParameterExpression param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T));
    return Expression.Lambda(Expression.Call(param, method),
                             new ParameterExpression[] { param });
}

Usage would be like this:

foreach(var expression in results)
{
    mock.Setup((dynamic)expression);
    // ...
}

The important part here is the cast to dynamic before passing the expression to Setup.

share|improve this answer
    
I knew it would be simple, thanks Daniel. Would it be as simple as testing method.ReturnType.IsValueType and using my original when false, yours when true? And yes, fair point. The original code contained some bits to generate args, I didn't cut it down enough, my mistake. –  Smudge202 Apr 22 '13 at 14:20
1  
@Smudge202: You can use this version even if the return type of the method is a reference type, so there isn't really a necessity to use two different versions. Thanks for spotting the error from my inplace refactoring :) –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 22 '13 at 14:23
    
Although your suggestion works, it does break Moq. :( System.ArgumentException: Expression is not a method invocation <param> => (Object)<param>.SomeMethod(). Did I/we place the convert in the wrong place? Feels like I need to wrap the whole thing in a another method call just to get Moq to like it, but then I suspect it's actually struggling to find the new definition as a method signature on the mocked classes which would explain the requirement for the root node being a MethodCall. –  Smudge202 Apr 22 '13 at 14:27
    
@Smudge202: What's the signature of mock.Setup? What's the exact type of the parameter it expects? Are there overloads of that method? –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 22 '13 at 14:35
1  
@Smudge202: Hehe, alright :) Just out of academic curiosity: In what way does it break the callbacks? –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 22 '13 at 15:01

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