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I am trying to write a string in a cache file (.txt) with the StreamWriter. It is working however the string in the cache file appears to be different from the string I want to copy. My input string contains an special character 'ƒ' and the output string written in the cache file contain a classic 'f'. I specified an encoding :

var writer = new StreamWriter(stream, Encoding.GetEncoding("ISO-8859-1"))

Do I need to specify another encoding?

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I guess this confusion comes from browsers, some databases etc treating ISO-8859-1/Latin1 as an alias for Windows-1252 which supports the character whereas Encoding doesn't do that. So you probably meant Windows-1252 and it would have worked. :P –  Esailija Apr 22 '13 at 20:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Simply use the UTF-8 encoding. Your character is supported by it and if most of the other characters are in the ASCII range, then your file will be no larger than if it was encoded with the ISO-8859-1 encoding, because the UTF-8 encoding uses only 1 byte to encode characters in the ASCII range (if that's a concern). Here's more info from Wikipedia.

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thanks to everyone it s now working –  fabco63 Apr 22 '13 at 14:42

That character (LATIN SMALL LETTER F WITH HOOK) doesn't appear in iso-8859-1, so yes, you'll need a different encoding; probably utf-8.

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The ISO-8859-1 encoding does not have that character.

You should always use Encoding.UTF8.

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"always" is a strong word; UTF-8 is a reasonable default for anyone who isn't sure what they are doing with encodings, as it'll usually get the job done. That is very far from "always", though –  Marc Gravell Apr 22 '13 at 14:15

You should use UTF8 - the desired character is not available in ISO-8859-1.

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