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I've come across this problem often and thought I'd finally ask for an explanation. I have Google Chrome and use the javascript console often. When I declare a global variable I can always access its content in the console but often when I try to access the variable from inside a function when the script runs in the browser I get a "Cannot read property 'top' of undefined" type error.

I'll paste a piece of code here and if someone could explain to me why I get this error I'd very much appreciate it!

// JavaScript Document
var myglobalvariable;
// ...

$(document).ready( function() {
  myglobalvariable = document.getElementsByTagName("article");
  // ...
});

function myFunction() {
  for (i in myglobalvariable) {
    mylocalvariable_top = myglobalvariable[i].style.top; // Error points to this line
  // ...
  }
}

myFunction will then typically be called by an event handler and report the error mentioned above.

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1  
for in should only be used with objects, not arrays –  Jeff Shaver Apr 22 '13 at 15:08
    
off topic: You have all the jQuery helpers available, yet you're not willing to use them? –  Dan Lee Apr 22 '13 at 15:09
    
@DanLee I had jQuery helpers in my script but it's a pretty performance heavy process I'm running. I googled performance on jQuery helpers and some developers commented that jQuery selectors takes longer to process. So I set about trying to have my script run quicker. Partially doing it this way to learn more about performance. –  Ardinent Apr 22 '13 at 15:18
1  
@user2307877 Then why bother using a ~90kb library in the first place? Just for DOM ready? There are easier ways to do this. –  Dan Lee Apr 22 '13 at 15:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As others have said, best to avoid for ... in for arrays. That said, just to clarify the misunderstanding that is producing this error, you should write:

function myFunction() {
  for (i in myglobalvariable) {
    mylocalvariable_top = i.style.top; // <-- i IS the element
                                       // <-- for clarity you should probably rename "i" to
                                       //    "element" or something more descriptive which will
                                       //      make clear it is not a numerical index
  // ...
  }
}

That is, it doesn't make sense to do the lookup myglobalvariable[i] since in your case i already means "the i-th element of the array myglobalvariable"

You are simply mixing up the conventions of a typical for loop with those of the for... in construct.

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Thank you Jonah for clarifying. Understand the error now. –  Ardinent Apr 22 '13 at 15:26

This creates an NodeList of nodes.

$(document).ready( function() {
  myglobalvariable = document.getElementsByTagName("article");
  // ...
});

This iterates through each node and any additional attributes on the NodeList object.

function myFunction() {
  for (i in myglobalvariable) {
    mylocalvariable_top = myglobalvariable[i].style.top; // Error points to this line
  // ...
  }
}

That said, you can encounter items in myglobalvariable that aren't nodes and don't have a style attribute. In particular, i will be item and length at some point during iteration.

This will more safely iterate over the list:

function myFunction() {
  for (var i = 0; i < myglobalvariable.length; i++) {
    mylocalvariable_top = myglobalvariable[i].style.top; // Error points to this line
  // ...
  }
}
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1  
getElementsByTagName returns a NodeList, it is like an Array in many ways, but isn't one. –  Quentin Apr 22 '13 at 15:14
    
@Quentin Corrected. –  svidgen Apr 22 '13 at 15:16
    
The above mentioned for loop sorted out the problem. Thank you svidgen :) –  Ardinent Apr 22 '13 at 15:24

I suspect that what you are doing is not what you want.

for (i in myglobalvariable) { }

This does not loop through items in an array but instead keys/property names of an object.

myglobalvariable[i]

Above you access what ever type the property with that key is.

myglobalvariable[i].style.top

Above you access the style property of said object. If that object does not have a style property then this will be undefined. Meaning that when you call .top on a property which does not exist you get "Cannot read property 'top' of undefined".

What you are presenting here is a specific problem and not a general "Global Scope Misinterpretation".

Solution

var i, len = myglobalvariable.length;
for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    if (myglobalvariable[i].style)
        mylocalvariable_top = myglobalvariable[i].style.top;
  // ...
}
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