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I have the following plot:

fig,ax = plt.subplots(5,2,sharex=True,sharey=True,figsize=fig_size)

and now I would like to give this plot common x-axis labels and y-axis labels. With "common", I mean that there should be one big x-axis label below the whole grid of subplots, and one big y-axis label to the right. I can't find anything about this in the documentation for plt.subplots, and my googlings suggest that I need to make a big plt.subplot(111) to start with - but how do I then put my 5*2 subplots into that using plt.subplots?

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1  
With the update to the question, and the comments left in the answers below this is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/6963035/… –  Hooked Apr 22 '13 at 19:55
    
Not really, since my question is for plt.subplots(), and the question you link to uses add_subplot - I can't use that method unless I switch to add_subplot, which I would like to avoid. I could use the plt.text solution which is given as an alternative solution in your link, but it is not the most elegant solution. –  Johan Lindberg Apr 23 '13 at 7:06
    
To elaborate, as far as I understand, plt.subplots cannot generate a set of subplots within an existing axis environment, but always creates a new figure. Right? –  Johan Lindberg Apr 23 '13 at 7:15
1  
Your currently accepted answer by @Marius does not answer your updated question. It would be useful if you updated the accepted answer so that others can find it more easily. –  divenex Dec 17 '14 at 13:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Since the command:

fig,ax = plt.subplots(5,2,sharex=True,sharey=True,figsize=fig_size)

you used returns a tuple consisting of the figure and a list of the axes instances, it is already sufficient to do something like (mind that I've changed fig,axto fig,axes):

fig,axes = plt.subplots(5,2,sharex=True,sharey=True,figsize=fig_size)

for ax in axes:
    ax.set_xlabel('Common x-label')
    ax.set_ylabel('Common y-label')

If you happen to want to change some details on a specific subplot, you can access it via axes[i] where i iterates over your subplots.

It might also be very helpful to include a

fig.tight_layout()

at the end of the file, before the plt.show(), in order to avoid overlapping labels.

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I'm sorry I was a bit unclear above. With "common" I meant one single x label below all the plots, and one single y label to the left of the plots, I have updated the question to reflect this. –  Johan Lindberg Apr 22 '13 at 19:34
1  
@JohanLindberg: Concerning your comments here and above: Indeed plt.subplots() will create a new figure instance. If you want to stick with this command, you can easily add a big_ax = fig.add_subplot(111), since you already have a figure and can add another axis. After that, you can manipulate big_ax the way it is shown in the link from Hooked. –  Marius Apr 23 '13 at 8:13
    
Thanks for your suggestions, but if I do that, I have to add the big_ax after plt.subplots(), and I get that subplot on top of everything else - can I make it transparent or send it to the back somehow? Even if I set all the colors to none as in Hooked's link, it is still a white box covering all my subplots. –  Johan Lindberg Apr 23 '13 at 11:49
1  
@JohanLindberg, you're right, I hadn't checked that. But you can easily set the background color of the big axis to none by doing: big_ax.set_axis_bgcolor('none') You should also make the labelcolor none (as opposed to the example linked by Hooked): big_ax.tick_params(labelcolor='none', top='off', bottom='off', left='off', right='off') –  Marius Apr 23 '13 at 13:21
    
Thanks, this actually seems to work. I had already fixed it by the plt.text solution discussed earlier, but now I can change to this more elegant solution. –  Johan Lindberg Apr 23 '13 at 17:25

This looks like what you actually want. It applies the same approach of this answer to your specific case:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig, ax = plt.subplots(nrows=3, ncols=3, sharex=True, sharey=True, figsize=(6, 6))

fig.text(0.5, 0.04, 'common X', ha='center')
fig.text(0.04, 0.5, 'common Y', va='center', rotation='vertical')

Multiple plots with common axes label

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Without sharex=True, sharey=True you get:

enter image description here

With it you should get it nicer:

fig, axes2d = plt.subplots(nrows=3, ncols=3,
                           sharex=True, sharey=True,
                           figsize=(6,6))

for i, row in enumerate(axes2d):
    for j, cell in enumerate(row):
        cell.imshow(np.random.rand(32,32))

plt.tight_layout()

enter image description here

But if you want to add additional labels, you should add them only to the edge plots:

fig, axes2d = plt.subplots(nrows=3, ncols=3,
                           sharex=True, sharey=True,
                           figsize=(6,6))

for i, row in enumerate(axes2d):
    for j, cell in enumerate(row):
        cell.imshow(np.random.rand(32,32))
        if i == len(axes2d) - 1:
            cell.set_xlabel("noise column: {0:d}".format(j + 1))
        if j == 0:
            cell.set_ylabel("noise row: {0:d}".format(i + 1))

plt.tight_layout()

enter image description here

Adding label for each plot would spoil it (maybe there is a way to automatically detect repeated labels, but I am not aware of one).

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If you want a long label to extend across multiple subplots see this answer. This is why your "googlings" suggest making a large subplot first.

If, however, you want a common x,ylabel for all subplots you can simply loop over them:

import pylab as plt

fig = plt.figure()

# Create the subplots
for n in xrange(9): 
    fig.add_subplot(3,3,n+1)

# Loop over the subplots and set the label
for ax in fig.get_axes():
    ax.set_xlabel("common X")
    ax.set_ylabel("common Y")
plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry I was a bit unclear above. With "common" I meant one single x label below all the plots, and one single y label to the left of the plots, I have updated the question to reflect this. –  Johan Lindberg Apr 22 '13 at 19:33

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