Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following in a Javascript console:

var a = {'foo': []};
var b = {};

for (var key in a) {
   b[key] = a[key];
}

a['foo'].push(1);

console.log(b);

Yields:

Object foo=[1]

I want to make a copy by value in b of each array for each key in a. Is there an easier way?

share|improve this question
    
How do you get a "javascript console"? –  OscarRyz Oct 23 '09 at 18:44
    
Oscar- using Firebug inside Firefox, or Safari's Web Inspector. –  Wells Oct 23 '09 at 18:52
    
@Oscar: You need FireBug for console.log function to work. –  Ivan Nevostruev Oct 23 '09 at 18:52
add comment

4 Answers

You could make a "clone" function that creates a new object, based on the original object constructor, and then clone that original object properties also if they are objects:

function clone(obj){
  if(typeof(obj) != 'object' && obj != null) 
    return obj; // return the value itself if isn't an object
                // or null, since typeof  null == 'object';

    var temp = new obj.constructor();

    for(var key in obj)
        temp[key] = clone(obj[key]);
    return temp;
}


var a = {'foo': []};
var b = clone(a);

a['foo'].push(1);

console.log(b); // Object foo=[0]
share|improve this answer
    
I ran across this problem before, and this is exactly how I solved it. +1 –  NateDSaint Oct 23 '09 at 18:37
1  
Prototyping breaks this. Simply Object.prototype.foo = function () {}; will create infinite recursion. –  Jonathan Lonowski Oct 23 '09 at 18:41
    
@Jonathan: added an if statement to stop recursion. –  CMS Oct 23 '09 at 18:53
    
Does this work? a['bar'] = a; console.log(clone(a)); –  Josh Stodola Oct 23 '09 at 19:17
    
Same problem here CMS: obj.constructor() is going to die on constructor functions (temp will be undefined), and potentially clobber globals. –  Crescent Fresh Dec 22 '09 at 21:27
show 1 more comment

As this will add support for deep-copying arrays in your code:

var a = {'foo': []};
var b = {};

for (var key in a) {
   if (Object.prototype.toString.call(b[key]) === "[object Array]") {
      b[key] = a[key].slice(0);
   } else {
      b[key] = a[key];
   }
}

a['foo'].push(1);

console.log(b);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Easier way:

var a = {'foo': []};
var b = a;

a['foo'].push(1);

console.log(b);

Output is the same.

Edit:

var a = {'foo': []};
var b = {};

for (var key in a) {
    if (a.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
        b[key] = [];
        for (var i = 0; i < a[key].length; i += 1) {
            b[key][i] = a[key][i];
        }
    }
}

a['foo'].push(1);

console.log(b);
share|improve this answer
    
Anatoliy: I don't want b to simply be a reference to a; I want b to be a unique copy by value of the arrays stored in a so that when I push to a's arrays it does not affect b. –  Wells Oct 23 '09 at 18:33
    
Fixed. Currently output is object with empty array. –  Anatoliy Oct 23 '09 at 18:39
1  
You can simplify all of that deep-copy stuff with a[key].slice(0). –  Eli Grey Oct 23 '09 at 19:31
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.