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Imagine, there are 3 projects. A library, and 2 executables.

Both programs use the library. Project 1, creates many instances of classes inside there, saves them with a serializer. Project 2, loads them, but should NEVER make any changes on them.

So, it should be read-only for project 2, but project 1 should have full access to it. How do I design that?

Lets say, there is this class in the library:

public string Name { get; private set;} 
public int Age { get; private set;}

public Person(string Name, int Age)
{
   this.Name = Name;
   this.Age = Age;
}

This would be perfect for project 2, who uses it as a read only.

But very annoying for project 1, because as soon it as to change just one property in the class, it has to create an entire new instance. Not annoying when having 2 properties, but very annoying when having like 10 properties. Project 2 even would be happy when these values are const.

What's the best way to design that?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Conditional compiling could do it, simply create new build configurations in Visual Studio and use a conditional compilation symbol, then wrap all the writable statements so they get compiled with one configuration but not the other, for example:

public string Name { 
    get; 
#if WriteSupport
    private set;
#endif
} 
public int Age { 
    get; 
#if WriteSupport
    private set;
#endif
}

public Person(string Name, int Age)
{
   this.Name = Name;
   this.Age = Age;
}
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Wow, that's awesome, works perfectly :) –  Robin Betka Apr 22 '13 at 18:39

Interface are the way to do things like that.

public IPerson
{
    string Name { get; }
    int Age { get; }
}

In Project1 :

public class Person : IPerson
{
    public string Name { get; set;} 
    public int Age { get; set;}

    public Person(string name, int age)
    {
       this.Name = name;
       this.Age = age;
    }
}

In Project2:

public class Person : IPerson
{
    public readonly string _name;
    public string Name { get { return _name; } } 

    private readonly int _age;
    public int Age { get { return _age; } }

    public Person(string name, int age)
    {
       this._name = name;
       this._age = age;
    }
}

Note that true immutable class use readonly field instead of private setter.
A private setter allow the instance to modifiy his state after his creation, and so it is not a truly immutable instance.
Whereas a reaonly field can be set in constructor only.

Then you can have same methods sharing via extensions:

public static class PersonExtensions
{
    public static string WhoAreYou(this IPerson person)
    {
        return "My name is " + person.Name + " and I'm " + person.Age + " years old.";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Looks good :) I have these classes inside the library, so creating an interface and the 2 classes using it there? –  Robin Betka Apr 22 '13 at 16:45
    
It really depends of your need. The two classes could be in the same project and having different names, or only the interface should be in the library, and each class in each project. It's up to you and the logic of your business. –  Cyril Gandon Apr 22 '13 at 16:46

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