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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Parent
{
public:
    Parent() {}
    virtual void foo() { cout << "My favorite song is:"; bar(); }
    virtual void bar() {}
};

class Child : public Parent
{
public:
    Child() : Parent() {}
    virtual void bar() { cout << "Singing in the Rain"; }
    void baz() { Parent::foo(); }
};

int main()
{
      Child().baz(); // Outputs "My favorite song is: Singing in the Rain"
      return 0;
}

The answer is YES. The above code works as expected.

share|improve this question
4  
Try it. (fill ) – Pete Becker Apr 22 '13 at 16:33
    
What happened when you tried it out? – juanchopanza Apr 22 '13 at 16:34
    
BTW this is a technique used to implement the template method pattern in C++. – juanchopanza Apr 22 '13 at 16:38
1  
Facepalm - I thought I was doing this exact thing in my code and it appeared to not be working so I thought there was something wrong. Turns out the only thing wrong is my code! This is definitely possible. – Cory Klein Apr 22 '13 at 16:43
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is it possible to call a subclass virtual function from within superclass implementation?

It is certainly possible. But you need to actually establish that inheritance relationship. For instance:

class Child : public Parent
//          ^^^^^^^^
//          For instance...
{
public: // Make at least baz() accessible from the outside
    // ...
}; // <== And don't forget the semicolon here

And you also need to give member functions in the base class proper accessibility if they have to be invoked by Child:

class Parent
{
public: // <== For instance, you could make the member functions public
    virtual void foo() { cout << "My favorite song is:"; bar(); }
    virtual void bar() {}
}; // <== Do not forget this

For a complete example, see this live demo.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the public inheritance? I may be overlooking something, but the only thing I see that relies on it is Child::baz, and that can "see" the base class regardless of accessibility. I wouldn't have asked if you just used public as a sensible default, but you specifically mark the public keyword there with ^^^^^^^^. – hvd Apr 22 '13 at 16:39
    
@hvd: That was just an example. I simply wanted to mention that an inheritance relationship needs to be there, and wanted to show a way to make the code compile. – Andy Prowl Apr 22 '13 at 16:40
    
That looks a lot clearer to me now, after your edit :) – hvd Apr 22 '13 at 16:41
    
The above code was meant to be pseudo-code, although I did forget to show that the Child really was a child of Parent. Turns out I came to this question with a bunch of wrong assumptions, and I'm kind of embarrassed about it now... – Cory Klein Apr 22 '13 at 16:44

Is it possible to call a subclass virtual function from within superclass implementation?

Yes, but beware when doing this from within the constructors and destructor, since the type of the object evolves as different constructors/destructors complete. In particular during the execution of the Parent constructor/destructor, the type of the object is Parent regardless of the type of the whole object being constructed.

There are a couple of smells in the code (other than the obvious syntactic errors that the compiler will catch and the lack of inheritance). For example, foo is a virtual function in the base, but in the implementation of Child::baz you are explicitly calling that override (i.e. disabling dynamic dispatch), which might be intentional or not (you could just call foo()).

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