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I'm writing a query for an application that needs to list all the products with the number of times they have been purchased.

I came up with this and it works, but I am not too sure how optimized it is. My SQL is really rusty due to my heavy usage of ORM's, But in this case a query is a much more elegant solution.

Can you spot anything wrong (approach wise) with the query?


SELECT  products.id, 
        products.long_name AS name, 
        count(oi.order_id) AS sold
FROM    products
LEFT OUTER JOIN 
      ( SELECT * FROM orderitems
        INNER JOIN orders ON orderitems.order_id = orders.id 
        AND orders.paid = 1 ) AS oi 
      ON oi.product_id = products.id
GROUP BY products.id

The schema (with relevant fields) looks like this:

*orders*      id, paid
*orderitems*  order_id, product_id
*products*    id

UPDATE

This is for MySQL

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure about the "(SELECT *" ... business.

This executes (always a good start) and I think is equivalent to what was posted.

SELECT  products.id, 
    products.long_name AS name, 
    count(oi.order_id) AS sold
FROM    products
LEFT OUTER JOIN
    orderitems AS oi
        INNER JOIN 
            orders 
            ON oi.order_id = orders.id AND orders.paid = 1
    ON oi.product_id = products.id
GROUP BY products.id
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Without parenthesis around the inner join, are you sure this gives the same answer as the original query? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Oct 2 '08 at 10:08
    
lassevek, it does give the correct answer, I guess MySQL interprets it correctly because since it is a nested join. I still added parenthesis though. –  Kevin Chan Oct 2 '08 at 10:13
    
Joins, they're beauty is often overlooked. :) Excellent refactoring job! –  willasaywhat Oct 2 '08 at 13:22
    
So, MySQL does not object to SELECT products.long_name which is neither a GROUP BY column nor an aggregate? Impressive. –  tzot Oct 2 '08 at 14:26
    
@ΤΖΩΤΖΙΟΥ: products.long_name is probably a functional dependency of products.id, so it should give the correct result. –  Bill Karwin Oct 3 '08 at 0:46

Here a solution for those of us who are nesting impaired. (I get so confused when I start nesting joins)

SELECT  products.id, 
    products.long_name AS name, 
    count(oi.order_id) AS sold
FROM orders 
    INNER JOIN orderitems  AS oi ON oi.order_id = orders.id AND orders.paid = 1
    RIGHT JOIN products ON oi.product_id = products.id
GROUP BY products.id

However, I tested your solution, Mike's and mine on MS SQL Server and the query plans are identical. I can't speak for MySql but if MS SQL Server is anything to go by, you may find the performance of all three solutions equivalent. If that is the case I guess you pick which solution is clearest to you.

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Thanks! I checked the query plans in MySQL and it looks like yours and Mike's query plans are the same, and my solution taking one more step. –  Kevin Chan Oct 2 '08 at 14:10

Does it give you the right answer?

Except for just modifying it to get rid of the SELECT in the inner query, I don't see anything wrong with it.

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Thanks! thats exactly what I felt was needed! –  Kevin Chan Oct 2 '08 at 10:08

Well you have "LEFT OUTER JOIN" that can be a performance issue depending on your Database. Last time I remember it caused hell on MySQL, and it doesn't exist in SQLite. I think Oracle can handle it ok, and I guess DB and MSSQL too.

EDIT: If I remember correctly LEFT OUTER JOIN can be orders of magnitude slower on MySQL, but please correct me if I'm outdated here :)

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Untested code, but try it:

SELECT  products.id,
    MIN(products.long_name) AS name, 
    count(oi.order_id) AS sold
FROM    (products
LEFT OUTER JOIN orderitemss AS oi ON oi.product_id = products.id)
INNER JOIN orders AS o ON oi.order_id = o.id 
WHERE orders.paid = 1
GROUP BY products.id

I don't know if the parentheses are needed for the LEFT OUTER JOIN, neither if MySQL allows multiple joins, however the MIN(products.long_name) gives just the description, since for every products.id you have only one description.

Perhaps the parentheses need to be around the INNER JOIN.

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Thanks! the problem with your query is that it seems to negate the LEFT OUTER JOIN as the results do not return products with no sales. –  Kevin Chan Oct 2 '08 at 10:02
    
Then the parentheses should be around the INNER JOIN. –  tzot Oct 2 '08 at 14:24

Here's a subquery form.

SELECT
  p.id,
  p.long_name AS name,
  (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM OrderItems oi WHERE oi.order_id in
    (SELECT o.id FROM Orders o WHERE o.Paid = 1 AND o.Product_id = p.id)
  ) as sold
FROM Products p

It should perform roughly equivalent to the join form. If it doesn't, let me know.

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