Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The problem is that I need to generate a random integer between 0 and 999 (for investigation of a mathematical conjecture). All of the values need to have the same probability of coming up.

I have tried rand(), but with RAND_MAX being 32767 (on my compiler) this means that just taking rand() % 1000 leads to the first 1–767 being significantly more likely to come up (and that's assuming that all possibilities have the same probability in rand() in the first place).

I'm using Windows so /dev/random isn't an option.

share|improve this question
    
Can't find the dup, but you need 1000 * (((double)rand()) / RAND_MAX) –  dasblinkenlight Apr 22 '13 at 17:57
1  
You don't mean truly random. That means something else. Saying "truly" random as an exaggerator is like abusing "literally." –  djechlin Apr 22 '13 at 18:02
1  
Its worth noting that "truly random" and "uniform distribution" are different concepts. You're not looking for something truly random since you are using psuedo-random number generation. –  krsteeve Apr 22 '13 at 18:03
1  
@user93353 no, that's C, this is C++. –  djechlin Apr 22 '13 at 18:03
4  
This question is definitely not a duplicate of a question about C. –  bames53 Apr 22 '13 at 18:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can do something like this using uniform_int_distribution with C++11:

#include <iostream>
#include <random>

int main()
{
    std::random_device rd;
    std::mt19937 gen(rd());
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> dis(0, 999);

    for (int n=0; n<1000; ++n)
        std::cout << dis(gen) << ' ';
    std::cout << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for a straight C++ answer. –  user529758 Apr 22 '13 at 18:01
    
That looks like the sort of thing I was looking for. Unfortunately, I don't have access to C++11. –  user1546083 Apr 22 '13 at 18:10
1  
@user1546083: All of this is in boost in a C++03 compatable form. –  Mooing Duck Apr 22 '13 at 18:16
    
This should work with vs2012, including random_device being a non-deterministic pRNG (base on Windows' cryptography services I believe). –  bames53 Apr 22 '13 at 18:34

Your modulus observation is correct, and one of several reasons that rand() doesn't hold up to mathematical scrutiny. From the notes here:

There are no guarantees as to the quality of the random sequence produced. In the past, some implementations of rand() have had serious shortcomings in the randomness, distribution and period of the sequence produced (in one well-known example, the low-order bit simply alternated between 1 and 0 between calls). rand() is not recommended for serious random-number generation needs, like cryptography.

C++11 introduces several new random number generators that hold to stricter standards that would likely be suitable for your purposes..

If you can sacrifice more than a few bytes of overhead (it's safe to assume that you can), I recommend std::mersenne_twister_engine

share|improve this answer

I think the easiest way to do this is to just throw away the numbers in the interval [32000, 32767], and only apply the % 1000 to the remaining numbers. This should get you a much more even distribution.

Alternately you could use boost's random/uniform distribution components (or from C++11 if that's available) as these will provide a more sound PRNG than rand.

share|improve this answer

There is no such thing as "truly random" in computers. I also don't beleive there is any significantly higher chance of 1-767 (or technically, 0-767, in that case) than any other number. However, if you need "better" random numbers, and then C++11 has support for using Mersenne Twister, which is a higher grade random number generator.

Some more information here: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/random/mt19937/

share|improve this answer
1  
On Windows, for 1000 values, lower numbers are picked 1.539% more often than higher numbers. That may be significant for what he's doing. –  Mooing Duck Apr 22 '13 at 18:14
1  
I was wrong about Windows' RAND_MAX, the lower numbers are picked 3.125% more often. –  Mooing Duck Apr 22 '13 at 18:21
  1. Get a random number using rand().

  2. Divide it with RAND_MAX. You will get a floating point number between 0 and 1.

  3. Multiply this number with 1000.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm skeptical that floating point rounding issues won't bias some integers after multiplying. –  djechlin Apr 22 '13 at 18:02
1  
For instance, 1000 turns up far less than 1/1000th of the time due to rounding down. –  djechlin Apr 22 '13 at 18:04
2  
That merely changes the distribution of (0-RAND_MAX) -> (0-1000) from being the lowest 767 to being an unpredictable 727. That doesn't make them even. –  Mooing Duck Apr 22 '13 at 18:15

the problem is that rand() gives you uniformly distributed variable on domain [0,RAND_MAX] with RAND_MAX being most likely 32767. You cannot map this domain into larger domain by a simple multiplication

u=(double)rand();
d=(double)RAND_MAX;
double div= u/d;
double res=div*interval_range;

because this would be correct only if RAND_MAX was an even multiple of interval_range. however you will not have all values in your larger domain then. But if your new, desired domain is smaller that RAND_MAX as in your case, you can truncate uniform distribution generated by rand() to your desired domain (what essentialy means reject rand() values greater than your desired domain). The truncated uniform distribution is still uniform, so you will have new uniformly distributed variable on your new domain (this will be conditional distribution more precisely). Statistical example:

enter image description here

so truncated uniform distribution will have another "moments", parameters that describe it (mean, std_dev, variance, etc) but will be uniform again.

Example code:

int main{ 
    int o=RAND_MAX;
    std::map<int,int> m1;
    int min=0,max=999;

    for (int i=0; i<1000*9994240; ++i){//9994240=305*32768  32768=RAND_MAX+1
        int r=rand();
        if(r<=max){
            m1[r]++;
        }
    }
    for (auto & i : m1)
        std::cout << i.first << " : " << i.second << '\n';
}

result: 0 : 42637 1 : 42716 2 : 42590 3 : 42993 4 : 42936 5 : 42965 6 : 42941 7 : 42705 8 : 42944 9 : 42707 10 : 42860 11 : 43012 12 : 42793 //... 995 : 42861 996 : 42911 997 : 42865 998 : 42877 999 : 43159


you can achieve desired result on any domain this way:

#include <iostream>
#include <random>

int main()
{
    std::random_device rd;
    std::mt19937 gen(rd());
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> dis(0, 1000);

    for (int n=0; n<1000; ++n)
        std::cout << dis(gen) << ' ';
    std::cout << '\n';
}

however you should really use boost in this case:

#include <iostream>
#include "boost/random.hpp"
#include "boost/generator_iterator.hpp"
using namespace std;

int main() {
      typedef boost::mt19937 RNGType;
      RNGType rng;
      boost::uniform_int<> zero_to_n( 0, 999 );
      boost::variate_generator< RNGType, boost::uniform_int<> >
                    dice(rng, zero_to_n);
          int n  = dice();

}
share|improve this answer
2  
Why do you say "you should really use boost", then follow it with an example that doesn't use boost? –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 22 '13 at 18:08
1  
What's patience have to do with it? I commented on your answer. If your answer was incomplete, why did you post it? –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 22 '13 at 18:14
1  
Surely this "int output = min + (rand() % (int)(max - min + 1))" is what I'm already doing, since min = 0. –  user1546083 Apr 22 '13 at 18:27
2  
Why do you believe that the expression min+((double)rand()/(double)RAND_MAX)*(max-min) results in a uniform distribution? It's still mapping RAND_MAX inputs to max-min outputs. So assuming that each possible input is equally likely, unless RAND_MAX is evenly divisible by max-min, some outputs will be more likely than others, therefore it is not uniform. I'm pretty sure that's the reason for MooingDuck's vote. –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 22 '13 at 18:53
1  
No. Not true. Perhaps this will demonstrate the point: ideone.com/5IjSNA -- Your solution has a similar problem, though it's not as pronounced. –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 22 '13 at 19:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.