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So I have code like such:

global ready
ready = False

class clazz():
    global ready
    someFunc():
        global ready
        ready = True

def otherFunc():
    global ready
    while 1:
        if not ready:
            print "not ready"

I call the someFunc() function from another place in my code, and the class code and the otherFunc() code are both in 2 separate threads for networking a game. However, when someFunc() is called, (otherFunc() had been called earlier) ready never updates in the while loop?

I thread the threads like this:

t1 = threading.Thread(target=funcToStartClazzCode)
t1.start()
t2 = threading.Thread(target=someFunc)
t2.start()

If you need anymore info, please tell me

complete code, including pygame and all networking methods: http://pastebin.com/vdJGhyfz

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closed as too localized by Wooble, talonmies, Mario, thaJeztah, Lukas Knuth Apr 22 '13 at 21:23

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3  
This is clearly not real code. Can you post an actual runnable example showing the problem you're having? –  abarnert Apr 22 '13 at 18:11
2  
Also, you cannot use a shared variable between two threads without some kind of locking. There is no guarantee that otherFunc will ever see the value written by someFunc. Plus, if you really have a function that's doing while 1: if not ready:, that's a very bad idea, because you're burning as much CPU time as possible just checking and rechecking the variable. The right way to do this is with a threading.Condition. –  abarnert Apr 22 '13 at 18:14
    
Finally… when I fix the obvious syntax errors and run this with CPython 2.7.2, it works as expected. On most runs, t2 sees the ready as True the very first time, so it just spins forever doing nothing. Every once in a while, t2 prints out "not ready" a few times before seeing it as ready. –  abarnert Apr 22 '13 at 18:19
1  
As a side note: Defining a class with () for the base class list raises red flags. First, if this is Python 2.x, you almost definitely want (object). Second, if you don't want any base classes, leave the parentheses off. There are some coding standards that mandate () to explicitly mark classic classes, and the only other reason to use them is to explicitly mark that you don't know that you can write class clazz:. –  abarnert Apr 22 '13 at 18:33

3 Answers 3

I don't know what your actual problem is. The code you posted has syntax errors, and calls the wrong function in t2, and is missing the funcToStartClazzCode, so I fixed all of that in the most obvious way…

import threading

ready = False

class clazz():
    def someFunc(self):
        global ready
        ready = True

def otherFunc():
    global ready
    while 1:
        if not ready:
            print "not ready"

def funcToStartClazzCode():
    c = clazz();
    c.someFunc();

t1 = threading.Thread(target=funcToStartClazzCode)
t1.start()
t2 = threading.Thread(target=otherFunc)
t2.start()
t1.join()
t2.join()

…and the resulting code does exactly what you want it to.

On most runs, t2 immediately sees ready as True and therefore never prints anything; every once in a while, it prints out "not ready" a few times.

Of course either way, there's a background thread running forever consuming 100% CPU, so you have to send it a signal from outside to kill it.

This isn't actually guaranteed to work, because you're using a shared variable across threads without any locking. It would be perfectly valid for t2 to see the original value forever, no matter how many times t1 updates it. Of course if you understand how CPython's GIL work, how it stores global variables, and how your computer and C compiler deal with cache flushing, you can prove that a program will not have that problem. But otherwise, you're just crossing your fingers and hoping.

You can fix this by adding a Lock (or RLock) and grabbing the lock around each access or change to ready. But a much better solution is to use a condition variable. Besides solving this synchronization problem, this also means you don't need to waste CPU spinning in t2.

import threading

ready = False
ready_cond = threading.Condition()

class clazz():
    def someFunc(self):
        global ready, ready_cond
        with ready_cond:
            ready = True
            ready_cond.notify()

def otherFunc():
    global ready, ready_cond
    with ready_cond:
        while not ready:
            print "not ready"
            ready_cond.wait()

def funcToStartClazzCode():
    c = clazz();
    c.someFunc();

t1 = threading.Thread(target=funcToStartClazzCode)
t1.start()
t2 = threading.Thread(target=otherFunc)
t2.start()
t1.join()
t2.join()

Of course this actually returns as soon as it's ready, unlike your original code. If you really want to keep waiting forever even after it's ready, add another loop outside the with ready_cond: that just, say, sleeps for 1 day at a time forever.

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I took a look at your actual code. Here's a snippet:

# ...
class Client(ConnectionListener):
    # ...
     def Network_ready(self, data):
         ready = True
         print "ready"

While you do mark ready as a global in a variety of different places (some of which are completely useless, like at the class level and at the module level), you've missed at least this one. So, instead of rebinding the global name ready, you're creating a brand-new local name, which nobody else can see (and which goes out of scope immediately anyway), leaving the global still False.

So, that's probably why your real code doesn't work, even though your sample code does.


There are some other really fishy things. For example, you're trying to use players as a global, and a class attribute, and an instance attribute all at the same time. You're also silently ignoring all exceptions in the client loop, which means you probably won't even notice that you're getting NameErrors all over the place and not running most of your code…

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You are misunderstanding how global works. You cannot declare a variable as global. Rather, when you use the variable, you must declare that you are using a global variable (if you want to assign a new value to it). You need a global ready inside your someFunc.

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Actually, I did have that there, I had forgotten to add that to the example code –  gomeow Apr 22 '13 at 18:10
    
@gomeow: Please post the actual code you are running. –  BrenBarn Apr 22 '13 at 18:14
    
Nitpick: Not when you use it, only when you assign to it. –  delnan Apr 22 '13 at 18:17
    
@delnan well if we're being really picky, it's when you use it within a scope in which you also assign to it. –  Daniel Roseman Apr 22 '13 at 18:25
    
@DanielRoseman: No, if you assign but don't use it, you need global as well. (You won't get an error otherwise, but you won't modify the global binding.) –  abarnert Apr 22 '13 at 18:34

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