Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I run the code:

connection = manager.connect("I2Cx")

The program crashes and reports a KeyError because I2Cx doesn't exist (it should be I2C).

But if I do:

try:
    connection = manager.connect("I2Cx")
except Exception, e:
    print e

It doesn't print anything for e. I would like to be able to print the exception that was thrown. If I try the same thing with a divide by zero operation it is caught and reported properly in both cases. What am I missing here?

share|improve this question
    
is this even valid python? ive never seen try / catch –  Joran Beasley Apr 22 '13 at 18:31
9  
"catch" is spelled "except" in Python –  bruno desthuilliers Apr 22 '13 at 18:32
4  
Side note: Unless you need pre-2.5 compatibility, you should write except Exception as e: instead of except Exception, e:. –  abarnert Apr 22 '13 at 18:47

3 Answers 3

If it's raising a KeyError with no message, then it won't print anything. If you do...

try:
    connection = manager.connect("I2Cx")
except Exception, e:
    print repr(e)

...you'll at least get the exception class name.

A better alternative is to use multiple except blocks, and only 'catch' the exceptions you intend to handle...

try:
    connection = manager.connect("I2Cx")
except KeyError, e:
    print 'I got a KeyError - reason "%s"' % str(e)
except IndexError, e:
    print 'I got an IndexError - reason "%s"' % str(e)

There are valid reasons to catch all exceptions, but you should almost always re-raise them if you do...

try:
    connection = manager.connect("I2Cx")
except KeyError, e:
    print 'I got a KeyError - reason "%s"' % str(e)
except:
    print 'I got another exception, but I should re-raise'
    raise

...because you probably don't want to handle KeyboardInterrupt if the user presses CTRL-C, nor SystemExit if the try-block calls sys.exit().

share|improve this answer
    
I think his problem was more the catch part than the actual printing ... but yeah this solves that problem also –  Joran Beasley Apr 22 '13 at 18:36
1  
@JoranBeasley The catch is more likely a typo, since the OP would've gotten a different error had that been in the real code. –  Aya Apr 22 '13 at 18:41
1  
+1. But KeyboardInterrupt and SystemExit aren't subclasses of Exception, so your last sentence is misleading. –  abarnert Apr 22 '13 at 18:48
    
@abarnert Actually it's the "catch all exceptions" which is misleading, so I've changed except Exception, e:, to except:. Looks like you have to consult sys.exc_info() to get the exception in a bare except: clause, so it's probably simpler to omit it. –  Aya Apr 22 '13 at 18:58
1  
Here's one example in the stdlib. I tend to use it most often when third-party library foo-0.88 raised a ValueError, but 0.89 raises a TypeError or a foo.FooError. (The alternatives are two copy-pasted except blocks, or an except Exception as e: with if isinstance(e, (ValueError, TypeError)): raise, or requiring foo-0.89 or later for no good reason…) –  abarnert Apr 22 '13 at 20:21

You should consult the documentation of whatever library is throwing the exception, to see how to get an error message out of its exceptions.

Alternatively, a good way to debug this kind of thing is to say:

except Exception, e:
    print dir(e)

to see what properties e has - you'll probably find it has a message property or similar.

share|improve this answer

I dont think python has a catch :)

try:
    connection = manager.connect("I2Cx")
except Exception, e:
    print e
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.