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You can see this code

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult RemoveFromCart(int id)
{
     // Remove the item from the cart
     var cart = ShoppingCart.GetCart(this.HttpContext);


...

public static ShoppingCart GetCart(HttpContextBase context)
{
    var cart = new ShoppingCart();
    cart.ShoppingCartId = cart.GetCartId(context);
    return cart;
}


// We're using HttpContextBase to allow access to cookies.
public string GetCartId(HttpContextBase context)
{
   if (context.Session[CartSessionKey] == null)
   {
       if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(context.User.Identity.Name))
       {
            context.Session[CartSessionKey] = context.User.Identity.Name;
       }
       else
       {
             // Generate a new random GUID using System.Guid class
             Guid tempCartId = Guid.NewGuid();

             // Send tempCartId back to client as a cookie
             context.Session[CartSessionKey] = tempCartId.ToString();
        }
   }

   return context.Session[CartSessionKey].ToString();
}

So why we cannot just use Session[CartSessionKey] directly?

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult RemoveFromCart(int id)
{
     // Remove the item from the cart
     var cart =  Session[CartSessionKey].ToString();
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is no substantive difference. The Session property on Controller is implemented as:

if (this.HttpContext != null)
    return this.HttpContext.Session;
else
    return null;

It's a convenience property, so it doesn't matter which one you use.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you just know that's how it's implemented from experimentation, or is that documented somewhere? +1 for your main point though, there is no real difference here. –  jadarnel27 Apr 22 '13 at 18:50
1  
ReSharper has an integrated decompiler which makes this sort of thing trivial. Also, the source code is available from MS if you include source server support in VS. –  Kirk Woll Apr 22 '13 at 18:59
    
Ah, very cool - I did not know that. Thanks for following up. –  jadarnel27 Apr 22 '13 at 19:28

Using the context guarantees that you are accessing the correct session. You should always check if your Session is null before using it. That is just good coding practice. Short cuts are lazy, lead to errors, and is bad practice.

share|improve this answer
2  
Controller.Session returns HttpContext.Session (with a null check) so your answer makes no sense. –  Kirk Woll Apr 22 '13 at 18:36

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