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I have a method that is declared to both accept and return null.

@CheckForNull
public static String truncate(@CheckForNull text, int maxLength) { ... }

It returns null only if text is null. When I pass in the return value from a method marked @Nonnull, FindBugs has no way to know that truncate will not return null and thus issues a warning if I assign it to a field marked @Nonnull.

@Nonnull
public static String trimmedOrEmptyIfNull(@CheckForNull text) { ... }
...
@Nonnull
private String message;
...
message = truncate(trimmedOrEmptyIfNull(e.getMessage()), 100);

The warning here is a false positive because trimmedOrEmptyIfNull is marked as @Nonnull and thus truncate will return a non-null value and could be inferred as @Nonnull itself.

Is there a way to make FindBugs aware of this connection between the nullability of the return value and the parameter?

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This is one of the many reasons I'm not convinced that nullability annotations will ever be feasible. –  Louis Wasserman Apr 22 '13 at 20:31

1 Answer 1

I haven't figured out a solution yet. The toughest part about implementing it is getting across that the method return value inherits not the nullability annotation of the text parameter but of the argument value passed to it, in this case that of trimmedOrEmptyIfNull. Here are some ideas:

  • Add a new parameter annotation to use in place of the existing annotation. This isn't clear that it applies to the method's return value, nor does it make checking the body of the method easy. Do you assume the parameter is marked @CheckForNull?

    public static String truncate(@InheritNullness text, int maxLength) { ... }
    
  • Add a parameter to a new method annotation. This also isn't clear that the nullability of the argument passed by the calling code is what is inherited.

    @Nullability(inherit = "text")
    public static String truncate(@CheckForNull text, int maxLength) { ... }
    
  • Since 99% of the cases will probably involve overriding a @CheckForNull or @Nullable annotation with @Nonnull (is that a reasonable assumption?), add a new parameter annotation to use in addition to the existing annotation. This isn't clear that it applies to the method's return value, nor does it make checking the body of the method easy. Do you assume the parameter is marked @CheckForNull?

    @CheckForNull
    public static String truncate(@InheritNonnull text, int maxLength) { ... }
    

I must admit I'm not really fond of any of them. :(

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