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This works fine:

[1]> ((lambda (x) (/ x x)) 5)
1

but this:

[2]> ((lambda (x y) (/ x y)) 5 2)
5/2

give me '5/2' instead of 2.5. How can I fix it?

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That's not a string, it's a rational number. –  Barmar Apr 22 '13 at 18:56
    
Could you explain it? I've just began learn this language. –  edem Apr 22 '13 at 18:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Common Lisp performs rational arithmetic whenever possible. If you want floating point, you either have to supplying at least one float as input to the arithmetic function, or use an explicit coercion function on the result.

((lambda (x y) (float (/ x y)) 5 2)

or

((lambda (x y) (/ x y)) 5.0 2)

Rational arithmetic is generally more exact than floating point. Consider this:

(setf x1 (/ 1 3)) => 1/3
(setf x2 (float (/ 1 3)) => 0.33333333
(* x1 3) => 1
(* x2 3) => 0.99999999
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Big thanks for this explanation. –  edem Apr 22 '13 at 19:03

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