Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Trying to learn to think like a functional programmer a little more---I'd like to transform a data set with what I think is either a fold or a reduce operation. In R, I would think of this as a reshape operation, but I'm not sure how to translate that thinking.

My data is a json string that looks like this:

s = 
'[
{"query":"Q1", "detail" : "cool", "rank":1,"url":"awesome1"},
{"query":"Q1", "detail" : "cool", "rank":2,"url":"awesome2"},
{"query":"Q1", "detail" : "cool", "rank":3,"url":"awesome3"},
{"query":"Q#2", "detail" : "same", "rank":1,"url":"newurl1"},
{"query":"Q#2", "detail" : "same", "rank":2,"url":"newurl2"},
{"query":"Q#2", "detail" : "same", "rank":3,"url":"newurl3"}
]'

I'd like to turn it into something like this, where query is the master key defining the 'row', nesting the unique "rows" corresponding to the "rank" values and "url" fields:

'[
{ "query" : "Q1",
    "results" : [
        {"rank" : 1, "url": "awesome1"},
        {"rank" : 2, "url": "awesome2"},
        {"rank" : 3, "url": "awesome3"}        
    ]},
{ "query" : "Q#2",
    "results" : [
        {"rank" : 1, "url": "newurl1"},
        {"rank" : 2, "url": "newurl2"},
        {"rank" : 3, "url": "newurl3"},        
    ]}
]'

I know I can iterate through, but I suspect there is a functional operation that does this transformation, right?

Would also be curious to know how to get to something more like this, Version2:

'[
{ "query" : "Q1",
    "Common to all results" : [
        {"detail" : "cool"}
    ],
    "results" : [
        {"rank" : 1, "url": "awesome1"},
        {"rank" : 2, "url": "awesome2"},
        {"rank" : 3, "url": "awesome3"}        
    ]},
{ "query" : "Q#2",
    "Common to all results" : [
        {"detail" : "same"}
    ],
    "results" : [
        {"rank" : 1, "url": "newurl1"},
        {"rank" : 2, "url": "newurl2"},
        {"rank" : 3, "url": "newurl3"}        
    ]}
]'

In this second version, I'd like to take all data repeating under the same query, and shove it into an "other stuff" container, where all the items unique under "rank" would be in the "results" container.

I'm working on json objects in mongodb, and can use either python or javascript to try out this transform.

Any advice, such as the proper name for this transformation, what might be the fastest way to do this on a large data set, is appreciated!

EDIT

Incorporating @abarnert's excellent solution below, trying to get my Version2 above for anyone else working on the same kind of problem, requiring bifurcating some keys under one level, other keys under another...

Here's what I tried:

from functools import partial
groups = itertools.groupby(initial, operator.itemgetter('query'))
def filterkeys(d,mylist):
    return {k: v for k, v in d.items() if k in mylist}

results = ((key, map(partial(filterkeys, mylist=['rank','url']),group)) for key, group in groups)
other_stuff = ((key, map(partial(filterkeys, mylist=['detail']),group)) for key, group in groups)

???

Oh no!

share|improve this question
    
You're asking two different things here. Do you want to know the functional fold-style way to do this, or the fastest way to do this? –  abarnert Apr 22 '13 at 19:17
    
I'd prefer both, but would trade off: I want to learn the functional style if it isn't so dramatically slower, if they are opposite goals? –  Mittenchops Apr 22 '13 at 19:30
    
They aren't necessarily opposite goals, but they're completely different goals that at least may contradict each other. Also, it's almost never a good idea to ask for, or even think about, the fastest way to do anything. First, get something that's correct and readable, and don't worry about performance beyond avoiding obvious big-O algorithmic problems. Then, if your code is too slow, profile it, and just rewrite the bottleneck to be faster, leaving the rest as readable as possible instead. –  abarnert Apr 22 '13 at 19:37
    
Makes sense, thank you. I appreciate the code and the advice. I was under the possibly mistaken assumption that functional solutions were handwavingly generally faster anyway? But totally understand, even if that's a case-by-case thing, I should have separated the question a bit better! –  Mittenchops Apr 22 '13 at 19:41
    
For most functional algorithms, there's an imperative version with the same big-O complexity, and vice-versa. But in Python, with its relatively high interpreter overhead… well, some functional solutions are usually faster (looping inside a call to map or a list comprehension is faster than an explicit for loop), some are usually slower (tail recursion vs. iteration), and some about the same. And some are inherently easier or harder to optimize in other ways (e.g., transforming immutable objects instead of mutating objects in place means you can CPU-parallelize). –  abarnert Apr 22 '13 at 19:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I know this isn't the fold-style solution you were asking for, but I would do this with itertools, which is just as functional (unless you think Haskell is less functional than Lisp…), and also probably the most pythonic way to solve this.

The idea is to think of your sequence as a lazy list, and apply a chain of lazy transformations to it until you get the list you want.

The key step here is groupby:

>>> initial = json.loads(s)
>>> groups = itertools.groupby(initial, operator.itemgetter('query'))
>>> print([key, list(group) for key, group in groups])
[('Q1',
  [{'detail': 'cool', 'query': 'Q1', 'rank': 1, 'url': 'awesome1'},
   {'detail': 'cool', 'query': 'Q1', 'rank': 2, 'url': 'awesome2'},
   {'detail': 'cool', 'query': 'Q1', 'rank': 3, 'url': 'awesome3'}]),
 ('Q#2',
  [{'detail': 'same', 'query': 'Q#2', 'rank': 1, 'url': 'newurl1'},
   {'detail': 'same', 'query': 'Q#2', 'rank': 2, 'url': 'newurl2'},
   {'detail': 'same', 'query': 'Q#2', 'rank': 3, 'url': 'newurl3'}])]

You can see how close we are already, in just one step.

To restructure each key, group pair into the dict format you want:

>>> groups = itertools.groupby(initial, operator.itemgetter('query'))
>>> print([{"query": key, "results": list(group)} for key, group in groups])
[{'query': 'Q1',
  'results': [{'detail': 'cool',
               'query': 'Q1',
               'rank': 1,
               'url': 'awesome1'},
              {'detail': 'cool',
               'query': 'Q1',
               'rank': 2,
               'url': 'awesome2'},
              {'detail': 'cool',
               'query': 'Q1',
               'rank': 3,
               'url': 'awesome3'}]},
 {'query': 'Q#2',
  'results': [{'detail': 'same',
               'query': 'Q#2',
               'rank': 1,
               'url': 'newurl1'},
              {'detail': 'same',
               'query': 'Q#2',
               'rank': 2,
               'url': 'newurl2'},
              {'detail': 'same',
               'query': 'Q#2',
               'rank': 3,
               'url': 'newurl3'}]}]

But wait, there's still those extra fields you want to get rid of. Easy:

>>> groups = itertools.groupby(initial, operator.itemgetter('query'))
>>> def filterkeys(d):
...     return {k: v for k, v in d.items() if k in ('rank', 'url')}
>>> filtered = ((key, map(filterkeys, group)) for key, group in groups)
>>> print([{"query": key, "results": list(group)} for key, group in filtered])
[{'query': 'Q1',
  'results': [{'rank': 1, 'url': 'awesome1'},
              {'rank': 2, 'url': 'awesome2'},
              {'rank': 3, 'url': 'awesome3'}]},
 {'query': 'Q#2',
  'results': [{'rank': 1, 'url': 'newurl1'},
              {'rank': 2, 'url': 'newurl2'},
              {'rank': 3, 'url': 'newurl3'}]}]

The only thing left to do is to call json.dumps instead of print.


For your followup, you want to take all values that are identical across every row with the same query and group them into otherstuff, and then list whatever remains in the results.

So, for each group, first we want to get the common keys. We can do this by iterating the keys of any member of the group (anything that's not in the first member can't be in all members), so:

def common_fields(group):
    def in_all_members(key, value):
        return all(member[key] == value for member in group[1:])
    return {key: value for key, value in group[0].items() if in_all_members(key, value)}

Or, alternatively… if we turn each member into a set of key-value pairs, instead of a dict, we can then just intersect them all. And this means we finally get to use reduce, so let's try that:

def common_fields(group):
    return dict(functools.reduce(set.intersection, (set(d.items()) for d in group)))

I think the conversion back and forth between dict and set may make this less readable, and it also means that your values have to be hashable (not a problem for you sample data, since the values are all strings)… but it's certainly more concise.

This will, of course, always include query as a common field, but we'll deal with that later. (Also, you wanted otherstuff to be a list with one dict, so we'll throw an extra pair of brackets around it).

Meanwhile, results is the same as above, except that filterkeys filters out all of the common fields, instead of filtering out everything but rank and url. Putting it together:

def process_group(group):
    group = list(group)
    common = dict(functools.reduce(set.intersection, (set(d.items()) for d in group)))
    def filterkeys(member):
        return {k: v for k, v in member.items() if k not in common}
    results = list(map(filterkeys, group))
    query = common.pop('query')
    return {'query': query,
            'otherstuff': [common],
            'results': list(results)}

So, now we just use that function:

>>> groups = itertools.groupby(initial, operator.itemgetter('query'))
>>> print([process_group(group) for key, group in groups])
[{'otherstuff': [{'detail': 'cool'}],
  'query': 'Q1',
  'results': [{'rank': 1, 'url': 'awesome1'},
              {'rank': 2, 'url': 'awesome2'},
              {'rank': 3, 'url': 'awesome3'}]},
 {'otherstuff': [{'detail': 'same'}],
  'query': 'Q#2',
  'results': [{'rank': 1, 'url': 'newurl1'},
              {'rank': 2, 'url': 'newurl2'},
              {'rank': 3, 'url': 'newurl3'}]}]

This obviously isn't as trivial as the original version, but hopefully it all still makes sense. There are only two new tricks. First, we have to iterate over groups multiple times (once to find the common keys, and then again to extract the remaining keys)

share|improve this answer
    
So, this definitely the right answer, but can I ask a follow-up getting the version 2 I asked about in the right format, expanding on the excellent solution you gave? Editing original question. –  Mittenchops Apr 23 '13 at 19:37
    
The request seems ambiguous. In your example, all of the rows have the same extra field, and all of the rows in the same query have the same value for that extra field. Can you assume that's always true? If not, how do you want to merge them together? For example, if one row for query Q1 has 'detail': 'cool', and another has 'detail': 'cooler', what ends up in otherstuff for Q1? –  abarnert Apr 23 '13 at 20:24
    
Yeah, sorry, that was totally vague---I would be making the same value assumption. I mean all the stuff common across results to be in "other_stuff" and not in "results": I should rename that "common stuff" or something---where all the items unique by rank would have been tucked under "results." –  Mittenchops Apr 23 '13 at 20:45
    
OK, I think I see. Let me edit the answer. –  abarnert Apr 23 '13 at 20:47
    
Thank you. You're a wizard and this is the best answer I've ever received on SO! –  Mittenchops May 10 '13 at 14:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.