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I have this class:

public class TestService
{
     public IObservable<int> GetObservable(int max)
     {
         var subject = new Subject<int>();
         Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
                               {
                                   for (int i = 0; i < max; i++)
                                   {
                                       subject.OnNext(i);
                                   }
                                   subject.OnCompleted();

                               });
         return subject;
     }
}

I wrote a test method for this as well:

[TestMethod]
public void TestServiceTest1()
{
   var testService = new TestService();
   var i = 0;
   var observable = testService.GetObservable(3);
   observable.Subscribe(_ =>
   {
      i++;
   });          
   observable.Wait();
   Assert.AreEqual(i, 3);
}

But sometimes I get the error: Sequence contains no elements in method Wait().

I propose that my IObservable is completed before test reaches the observable.Wait() line. How can I avoid this error?

share|improve this question
    
While my knowledge of Rx isn't great, I have watched some of the videos provided on Channel 9, and it seems to me that TestService.GetObservable would be better represented by System.Reactive.Linq.Observable.Range(0, max, System.Reactive.Concurrency.Scheduler.NewThread) –  DoomMuffins Apr 22 '13 at 19:48
    
@DoomMuffins. The matter is the right way of waiting IObservable. Not proper implemetation of GetObservable method –  takayoshi Apr 22 '13 at 20:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It seems to me that the basic problem in this code is that an IObservable represents a contract of how to observe something.

In this case, the GetObservable method is not just returning a contract, it is performing work (with TPL) right away. This does not make sense if you consider that you can subscribe multiple times to the same IObservable instance (which is in fact happening in the sample code, as you're subscribing a first time with Subscribe and another with Wait). This single distinction was the biggest stumbling block for me in learning Rx.

I would instead implement the method like this (and avoid altogether using Subject<>, since it is not the preferred way of creating an Observable):

public class TestService
{
     public IObservable<int> GetObservable(int max)
     {
         return Observable.Create<int>((IObserver<int> observer) =>
                               {
                                   for (int i = 0; i < max; i++)
                                   {
                                       observer.OnNext(i);
                                   }
                                   observer.OnCompleted();
                               });
     }
}

There are also interesting overrides to Observable.Create which provide more flexibility.

share|improve this answer
    
In order to properly test Rx queries, you should use a TestScheduler from the Rx-Testing NuGet package. You can schedule work inside the Observable.Create lambda, and in your test, you just check which events were recorded by the TestScheduler. –  Pedro Pombeiro Apr 22 '13 at 20:55
    
Great answer Pedro. You will also find that Observable.Range(0,100,TaskPoolScheduler.Default) is the correct implementation of what takayoshi is trying to achieve (as he was trying to introduce concurrency). However concurrency and unit tests are not good friends, favor the TestScheduler. –  Lee Campbell Apr 24 '13 at 15:13
    
I completely agree. I'm actually co-authoring a BDD unit test framework which should make it much more straightforward to unit test Rx code, providing guidance on how to test asynchronous code while maintaining great readability and maintainability. I'm looking forward to having the documentation at a point where I can start showing it to the community. –  Pedro Pombeiro Apr 24 '13 at 21:33
    
Cool. I am interested to see how this is different to normal unit testing or any other test framework -->Do we need another framework :-( –  Lee Campbell Apr 25 '13 at 9:08

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