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In our dev shop, we use client-side templates and include no HTML tags in our JavaScript code.

In our continuous integration process, we run JSHint automatically after every commit (post-build action in Jenkins) to verify compliance with our coding style guidelines.

I'd like to configure JSHint so it throws a warning when it finds an HTML tag in a .js file.

How can I accomplish this? I've searched, but I can find no examples of HTML tag warnings nor custom rules for JSHint.

Edit:

Just to be clear, I'm trying to catch code like this:

var newDiv = "<div>Hello World!</div>";
$("body").append(newDiv);

If I could get JSHint to produce a warning for the first line in the example above, that'd be fantastic.

Second Edit:

If there's post-build plugin for Jenkins that could throw a validation error if HTML is found in a .js file, then that'd also be a great alternative solution.

share|improve this question
    
having a html tag in a js file is generally going to error out anyway. Why do you need it within jshint? –  Ben McCormick Apr 22 '13 at 19:34
    
@ben336 I'm talking about things like this: var newDiv = "<div>form goes here</div>"; $('body').append(newDiv); –  Elliot B. Apr 22 '13 at 20:38
    
Thats just a string then. And not one that's "wrong" Anything that validated against that would also disallow something like var example="I'm writing a report on <div> tags and css"; –  Ben McCormick Apr 22 '13 at 20:52
1  
@ben336 The example you've provided would not be allowed in our dev shop. To be clear, I'm not advocating that everyone adopt our style of development, but I do still want JSHint to help enforce our internal coding style decisions. If you're interested, you should read up on what Nicholas Zakas and others have to say about maintainability and separation of concerns with JavaScript applications: bit.ly/pXUM9A –  Elliot B. Apr 22 '13 at 21:04

1 Answer 1

The Answer

No, jSHint does not support disallowing arbitrary string contents or HTML tags inside of strings. It also does not support custom rules, for now, though the author has discussed adding a public api in the future.

My speculation (as I am not an insider) on WHY

The solution you're proposing (disallowing any HTML tags in any scenario) would disallow a wide variety of highly valid use cases, regardless of how you feel about creating HTML in js. I understand that it is what your team wants to do, but such a blunt force rule is not going to have the general applicability of the rest of jsHints rules. Their focus is on enforcing style rules. Since you're disallowing all HTML tags in strings this is really more of a content validation than a style one. It would eliminate the following content examples, which are irrelevant to DOM injection/separation of concerns.

For instance:

var example="I'm writing a report on <div> tags and css";

or

var htmlStrippedText = text.replace("<div>","");

My Advice

Of course lack of broad applicability is not a reason for YOU not to do this. If you really want to filter content like this, use a command line script to search with a regex. Since you only want to see if there is HTML, not whether its valid, you can just search for stuff in the form <[div|span|body|html... as well as document.createElementand it should be fine (although you might have to be more creative if you want to allow it inside of comments). Just don't use nodejs to run your script with JS or it will fail to validate itself. :)

Of course none of this will stop a determined developer:

var topSecretDOMObject,topSecretFunction,topSecretArgument;
topSecretFunction = "create"+"Element";
topSecretArgument = "d" + "i" + "v";
topSecretDOMObject = document[topSecretFunction](topSecretArgument);
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2  
The example you've provided would not be allowed in our dev shop. To be clear, I'm not advocating that everyone adopt our style of development, but I do still want JSHint to help enforce our internal coding style decisions. If you're interested, you should read up on what Nicholas Zakas and others have to say about maintainability and separation of concerns with JavaScript applications: bit.ly/pXUM9A –  Elliot B. Apr 22 '13 at 21:06
    
I understand that you want to enforce that style. I'm trying to point out that there is no way to single out HTML that is being used to insert HTML from HTML being used in something like replace. In any case,my answer holds, no jsHint does not support this and also does not support custom rules –  Ben McCormick Apr 23 '13 at 0:23
    
There are no HTML tags in our JavaScript code. Your line: "there is no way to single out HTML that is being used to insert HTML from HTML being used in something like replace" doesn't relate to my question. It's not an issue if I can't differentiate between strings of HTML because there are zero circumstances where HTML tags exist in our JS code. I'm hoping there's some way JSHint can detect HTML and throw a warning. –  Elliot B. Apr 23 '13 at 7:51
    
And I have told you that there is not as of today :) I've expanded my answer and separated out the factual part from my commentary just to be clear. –  Ben McCormick Apr 23 '13 at 12:59
    
It's probably A Proverbial Good Thing to catch your, "I'm writing a report on <div> tags...". Why not force folks to write $("#logs").append("I'm writing a report on &lt;div&gt; tags and css");? And I'm not sure that the determined developer scenario lessens the usefulness of the OP's original question. Don't let the perfect get in the way of the good, etc. I'm not exactly arguing for @ElliotB. 's proposed rule, but the goal is less to prescribe culture than give a fix. Your JHint API possibility looks interesting. –  ruffin Apr 25 '13 at 12:53

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