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I have a data table similar to the one obtained with the following command:

dt <- data.table(
  time = 1:8,
  part = rep(c(1, 1, 2, 2), 2),
  type = rep(c('A', 'B'), 4),
  data = rep(c(runif(1), 0), 4))

Basically, such a table contains two different type of instances (A or B). The time column contains a timestamp for when a request arrived to or leaved from a certain part. If the instance type is A, the timestamp states the arrival time (enter), and if the type is B, the timestamp states the leaving time (exit).

   time part type      data
1:    1    1    A 0.5842668
2:    2    1    B 0.0000000
3:    3    2    A 0.5842668
4:    4    2    B 0.0000000
5:    5    1    A 0.5842668
6:    6    1    B 0.0000000
7:    7    2    A 0.5842668
8:    8    2    B 0.0000000

I would like to pair A and B instances, and obtain the following data table:

   part data        enter.time exit.time
1:    1 0.4658239   1          2
2:    1 0.4658239   5          6
3:    2 0.4658239   3          4
4:    2 0.4658239   7          8

I have tried the following:

pair.types <- function(x) {
  a.type <- x[type == 'A']
  b.type <- x[type == 'B']
  return(data.table(
      enter.time = a.type$time,
      exit.time = b.type$time,
      data = a.type$data))
}

dt[, c('enter.time', 'exit.time', 'data') := pair.types(.SD), by = list(part)]

But, that gives me the following, which is not exactly what I want:

   time part type      data enter.time exit.time
1:    1    1    A 0.3441592          1         2
2:    2    1    B 0.3441592          5         6
3:    3    2    A 0.3441592          3         4
4:    4    2    B 0.3441592          7         8
5:    5    1    A 0.3441592          1         2
6:    6    1    B 0.3441592          5         6
7:    7    2    A 0.3441592          3         4
8:    8    2    B 0.3441592          7         8

It is kind of close, but since column 'type' is kept, some rows are duplicated. Perhaps, I can try to remove columns 'time' and 'type', and then remove the second half of rows. But, I am not sure whether that will work in all the cases, and I would like to learn a better way to do this operation.

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Are your paired rows always one after the other? That is, first A and then the corresponding B –  Julián Urbano Apr 22 '13 at 21:16
    
@JuliánUrbano Yes, corresponding A-B pairs are always consecutive. At least, that has been the case in the data that I have observed so far. If it is not too much difficult, though, I would be interested in a general solution. –  betabandido Apr 22 '13 at 21:24
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2 Answers

Assuming your data looks like your example data:

dt[, list(part = part[1],
          data = data[1],
          enter.time = time[1],
          exit.time = time[2]),
     by = as.integer((seq_len(nrow(dt)) + 1)/2)]
#    by = rep(seq(1, nrow(dt), 2), each = 2)]
#    ^^^ a slightly shorter and a little more readable alternative

The idea is very simple - group rows in groups of 2 (that's the by part), i.e. each group will be one A and one B, then for each group take first part and first data and then the enter and exit times are just the first and second time's respectively. This is likely how you'd do this if you followed the by-hand logic, making it easy to read (once you know just a tiny bit about how data.table works).

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can you explain how this solution works? I want to upvote you because this seems really elegant, and the right answer but I don't feel it is useful to a wider audience without some explanations! Thanks :-) –  Simon O'Hanlon Apr 22 '13 at 21:29
    
@SimonO101 done –  eddi Apr 23 '13 at 0:45
    
I also have a nagging suspicion that the by part could be simplified a lot. –  eddi Apr 23 '13 at 0:55
1  
(+1) eddi, how about? dt[, as.list(c(data=data[1], entry=time[1], exit=time[2])), by = list(part, rep(1:4, each=2))] –  Arun Apr 23 '13 at 6:49
    
+1 thanks, your explanation helped me understand perfectly what you implemented. Great solution! –  Simon O'Hanlon Apr 23 '13 at 9:22
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Another way:

setkey(dt, "type")
dt.out <- cbind(dt[J("A"), list(part, data, entry.time = time)][, type := NULL], 
      exit.time = dt[J("B"), list(time)]$time)
#    part      data entry.time exit.time
# 1:    1 0.1294204          1         2
# 2:    2 0.1294204          3         4
# 3:    1 0.1294204          5         6
# 4:    2 0.1294204          7         8

If you want you can now do setkey(dt.out, "part") to get the same order.


The idea: Your problem seems a simple "reshaping" one to me. The way I've approached it is first to create a key column as type. Now, we can subset data.table for a specific value in the key column by: dt[J("A")]. This would return the entire data.table. Since you want the column time renamed, I explicitly mention which columns to subset using:

dt[J("A"), list(part, data, entry.time = time)]

Of course this'll return also the type column (= A) which we've to remove. So, I've added a [, type := NULL] to remove column type by reference.

Now we've the first part. All we need is the exit.time. This can be obtained similarly as:

dt[J("B"), list(time)] # I don't name the column here

But this gives a data.table when you need just the time column, which can be accessed by:

dt[J("B"), list(time)]$time

So, while using cbind I name this column as exit.time to get the final result as:

cbind(dt[J("A"), list(part, data, entry.time = time)][, type := NULL], 
      exit.time = dt[J("B"), list(time)]$time)

Hope this helps.

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1  
Arun same to you (see comment under eddi 's solution) - please can you explain for us data.table novices how this works?! –  Simon O'Hanlon Apr 22 '13 at 21:30
    
I usually write The idea: and explain. But I am still working on the answer :). –  Arun Apr 22 '13 at 21:31
    
lol!!! Yes ok, I often do this too - you have to be quick on here! Especially with sexy topics like data.table :-) –  Simon O'Hanlon Apr 22 '13 at 21:32
    
@SimonO101, no, you're totally right. Sometimes I forget to explain. It makes more sense to make that effort so that it's useful for a wider audience. I'll remember this for my future answers. –  Arun Apr 22 '13 at 21:44
    
Ah, yes, data.table syntax! So simple, compact, intuitive and easy to read! ;) –  joran Apr 22 '13 at 21:49
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