Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this class:

class CComputer {
public:
    // constructor    
    CComputer(string name) {
        this->name = name;
    };
    // overloaded operator << for printing
    friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const CComputer& c);

    // adds some component for this computer
    CComputer & AddComponent(Component const & component) {
        this->listOfComponents.push_back(component);
        return *this;
    };

    // sets address for this computer
    CComputer & AddAddress(const string & address) {
        this->address = address;
        return *this;
    };

    string name;
    string address;
    list<Component> listOfComponents;
};

and then these classes:

// ancestor for other classes...It's really dummy yet, but I dunno what to add there
class Component {
public:

    Component() {};

    ~Component() {};
};

class CCPU : public Component {
public:

    CCPU(int cores, int freq) {
        this->cores = cores;
        this->freq = freq;
    };

    int cores;
    int freq;
};

class CMemory : public Component {
public:

    CMemory(int mem) {
        this->mem = mem;
    };

    int mem;
};

Now I feed my CComputer class with some values:

 CComputer c("test.com");
 c . AddAddress("123.45.678.910") .
     AddComponent(CCPU(8, 2400)) .
     AddComponent(CCPU(8, 1200)).
     AddComponent(CMemory(2000)).
     AddComponent(CMemory(2000)));

And now I would like to print it out with all the info I've put in there (CCPU & CMemory details including)

but how to implement it, to be able to iterate through CComputer::listOfComponents and don't care if I acctually access CCPU or CMemory ? I can add it to that list, but I have really no idea, how to make it, to be able to access the variables of those components.

So the output should look like:

##### STARTING #####

CComputer:
   name:test.com
   address:123.45.678.910
      CCPU:
         cores:8,freq:2400
      CCPU:
         cores:8, freq:1200
      CMemory:
         mem:2000
      CMemory:
         mem:2000

###### FINISHED! #####
share|improve this question
1  
Don’t prefix your class names with C. That “convention” was based on a misunderstanding to disambiguate classes before compilers understood namespaces. It makes no sense nowadays. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '13 at 21:35
    
Sry...this is a part of my homework and I got the template of interface, that I have to follow...this idea dind't come from my head... Nevertheless thanks for the info.. –  Dworza Apr 22 '13 at 21:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As others have mentioned, you need to implement a virtual function (e.g. virtual std::string ToString() const = 0;) in the base class that is inherited and overridden by each child class.

However, that isn’t enough. Your code exhibits slicing which happens when you copy your child class instances into the list: the list contains objects of type Component, not of the relevant child class.

What you need to do is store polymorphic instances. Values themselves are never polymorphic, you need to use (smart) pointers or references for this. References are out, however, since you cannot store them in a standard container (such as std::list). Using raw pointers is considered bad style nowadays, but judging from the naming conventions of your classes you don’t learn modern C++ in your class (sorry!).

Therefore, raw pointers is probably the way to go. Change your code accordingly:

  • Store a list of pointers:

    list<Component*> listOfComponents;
    
  • Make the argument type of AddComponent a pointer instead of const&.

  • Call the function by passing a newed object, e.g.:

    AddComponent(new CCPU(8, 2400))
    

Now your code leaks memory left, right and center. You need to implement a destructor to free the memory:

~CComputer() {
    typedef std::list<Component*>::iterator iter_t;
    for (iter_t i = listOfComponents.begin(); i != listOfComponents.end(); ++i)
        delete *i;
}

But now your code violates the Rule of Three (read this article! It’s important, and it may be the most useful thing about C++ you’re going to learn in this programming class) and consequently you also need to implement the copy constructor and copy assignment operator. However, we can’t. Sorry. In order to implement copying for your class, you would have to implement another virtual function in your Component class, namely one that clones an object (virtual Component* Clone() const = 0;). Only then can we proceed.

Here’s a sample implementation in CCPU:

Component* Clone() const {
    return new CCPU(cores, freq);
}

… this needs to be done in all classes deriving from Component, otherwise we cannot correctly copy an object of a type that derives from Component and is hidden behind a pointer.

And now we can implement copying in the CComputer class:

CComputer(CComputer const& other)
        : name(name)
        , address(addess) {
    typedef std::list<Component*>::iterator iter_t;
    for (iter_t i = other.listOfComponents.begin(); i != other.listOfComponents.end(); ++i)
        listOfComponents.push_back((*i)->Clone());
}

CComputer& operator =(CComputer const& other) {
    if (this == &other)
        return *this;

    name = other.name;
    address = other.address;

    listOfComponents.clear();
    for (iter_t i = other.listOfComponents.begin(); i != other.listOfComponents.end(); ++i)
        listOfComponents.push_back((*i)->Clone());

    return *this;
}

This code is brittle, not thread-safe and error-prone and no competent C++ programmer would ever write this1. Real code would for instance use smart pointers instead – but as mentioned before I’m pretty sure that this would be beyond the scope of the class.


1 What does this make me now, I wonder?

share|improve this answer
    
Nicely done, sir. Clean & clear. Thanks. –  Dworza Apr 22 '13 at 22:35
    
¹ It makes you way too helpful for a simple answer. I'd have pointed out the essence (std::unique_ptr or Boost Pointer Containers). Then, link to the c++-faq "Rule Of Three" question :) –  sehe Apr 22 '13 at 22:35

Just add a virtual method to Class Component called e.g. toString(), which returns a string describing the component. Then you can iterate through all components and call toString() without worrying about exactly what each component is. If you do that, then for each computer you would be able to print out the values of all the components.

However, as pointed out in one of the comments, the example output you give in the question outputs the CCPU for all computers, then all the memory for all computers. To order the output like that, you'll need to add another virtual method to Component called e.g. getType() which returns an enum or integer that represents the type of the information. You can then have two for-next loops, one nested inside the other, where the outer loop iterates through all the types and the inner loop iterating through all the computers calling the toString() on all components which match the type specified in the outer for loop.

Here's something that implements this idea.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <list>

using namespace std;

int const TYPE_CCPU = 1;
int const TYPE_MEMORY = 2;

class Component {
public:
    virtual int GetType() { return -1; }
    virtual std::string ToString() const {
        return "OOPS! Default `ToString` called";
    }
};

class CComputer {
public:
    typedef std::list<Component*>::iterator iter_t;

    // constructor    
    CComputer(string name) {
        this->name = name;
    };
    ~CComputer() {
        for (iter_t i = listOfComponents.begin(); i != listOfComponents.end(); ++i) {
            delete *i;
        }
    }

    // overloaded operator << for printing
    friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const CComputer& c);

    // adds some component for this computer
    CComputer & AddComponent(Component *component) {
        this->listOfComponents.push_back(component);
        return *this;
    };

    // sets address for this computer
    CComputer & AddAddress(const string & address) {
        this->address = address;
        return *this;
    };

    void PrintType(int type) {
        for (iter_t i = listOfComponents.begin(); i != listOfComponents.end(); ++i) {
            if ((*i)->GetType() == type)
                std::cout << (*i)->ToString() << '\n';
        }
    }

    string name;
    string address;
    list<Component*> listOfComponents;
};

class CCPU : public Component {
public:

    CCPU(int cores, int freq) {
        this->cores = cores;
        this->freq = freq;
    };

    int GetType() { return TYPE_CCPU; }

    std::string ToString() const {
        return "CCPU::ToString()";
    }

    int cores;
    int freq;
};

class CMemory : public Component {
public:

    CMemory(int mem) { this->mem = mem; };

    int GetType() { return TYPE_MEMORY; }

    std::string ToString() const {
        return "CMemory::ToString()";
    }

    int mem;
};

typedef std::list<CComputer*>::iterator iter_c;

int main() {
    list<CComputer*> computerlist;
    CComputer *c1 = new CComputer("test.com"), *c2 = new CComputer("test2.com");
    c1->AddAddress("123.45.678.910").
        AddComponent(new CCPU(8, 1200)).
        AddComponent(new CMemory(2000));
    computerlist.push_back(c1);

    c2->AddAddress("987.65.432.10").
        AddComponent(new CCPU(8, 2400)).
        AddComponent(new CMemory(4000));
    computerlist.push_back(c2);

    for(int t=TYPE_CCPU; t<=TYPE_MEMORY; t++) 
        for (iter_c i = computerlist.begin(); i != computerlist.end(); ++i) {
            (*i)->PrintType(t);
    }

    for (iter_c i = computerlist.begin(); i != computerlist.end(); ++i) {
        delete (*i);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually that won’t work here. The code is slicing the objects. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '13 at 21:40
    
Good point @KonradRudolph, so I've beefed up my suggestion. –  Stochastically Apr 22 '13 at 21:48
    
Hehe, that won’t work either. You need to preserve the objects and you cannot do that with value semantics. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '13 at 22:06
    
Well, @KonradRudolph, I wasn't looking to solve the memory leak issues etc that you address! I think you'll find that you can get the requested printout using my methodology without introducing any additional issues into the code :-). –  Stochastically Apr 23 '13 at 7:50
    
Your answer does not account for slicing. Try it, it will fail. In fact, here is what would happen –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 23 '13 at 7:58

Implement ToString() in each of your classes. In .NET this is a standard even the "object" type implements.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.