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I was hoping that I could find some help here. I have an assignment due next week that involves reading a bunch of data from a txt file into an array, and then printing out the results. The data is in the following format:

"Macbeth","William Shakespeare","41.04","161","23","978-88-5985-004-5"

"A Christmas Carol","Charles Dickens","98.74","167","547","978-26-2885-780-7". .

.

.

Each row has six pieces of information that I need to store for later use. I'm supposed write code that counts the number of lines of text we have in order to create a dynamic array of the correct size. I've got that covered. I've got 39 lines entries. Then I'm supposed to create a function that reads the txt file and saves all of that data to the corresponding object in the array that I created.

I don't know what methods to use, and I've been looking around for tutorials and explanations for a few days. I have extremely limited experience with files and parsing, so excuse me if I'm a little inexperienced. Here's my code so far:

#include <fstream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;


class Author
{
    public:

private:
    string fname, lname;

};

class Book
{
    friend ofstream& operator<<(ofstream&, Book);

        public:
        Book();

    private:
        string bookName;
        Author author;
        double price;
        int qtyOnHand;
        int qtySold;
        double revenue;
        string ISBN;

};

Book :: Book()
{

}

int getLineNumber(ifstream &);
void parseData(ifstream &, Book []);


//void sortBookList(Book[], int, int);


int main()
{
    int numberOfBooks;

    //open the file from which to read the data
    ifstream myFile;
    myFile.open("Book List.txt");
    //function to find out how many objects to create
    numberOfBooks = getLineNumber(myFile);

    //create an array with that many objects
    Book *bptr;
    bptr = new Book[numberOfBooks];
    //function to read information from file into array of objects
    parseData(myFile, bptr);

    //loop to call sorting function and output function based on 4 different criteria

    //close the file explicitly
    return 0;
}

int getLineNumber(ifstream &myFile)
{
    int counter = 0;
    string myString;


    while(!myFile.eof())
    {
        getline(myFile, myString);
        counter++;
    }

    myFile.close();

    counter --;
    return counter;
}

void parseData(ifstream &myFile, Book bookPtr[])
{

}

So, to summarize my issues, I don't understand how to parse data from the text file into my array. A very big thank you in advance to anyone that could help! Cheers.

EDIT: I've tried fooling around with the code, and I think I made a step in the right direction, but I'm still a little lost. Here's what I have for the parseData function.

void parseData(ifstream &myFile, Book bookPtr[])
{

    string dummyLine;

    string word, line;
    myFile.open("Book List.txt");
    getline(myFile, dummyLine);
    string data[6];

    while(!myFile.eof())
    {
        getline(myFile, line, '\n');

        for (size_t i = 0; i < line.size(); ++i)
        {
            char c = line[i];

            if(c == ',' || c == '\n')
            {
                if(!word.empty())
                {
                    data[i] = word;
                    word.clear();
                }
            }
            else
            {
                word += c;
            }


        }
        if(!word.empty())
        {
            //cout << word << endl;
        }
    }




}
share|improve this question
    
What kind of functions are you looking for? getline() is useful, but you're already using that. You also seem to already know how to use strings. What else do you need? –  Brendan Long Apr 22 '13 at 22:44
    
What's not working about this new code? –  Brendan Long Apr 23 '13 at 19:10

3 Answers 3

Maybe you just need to know how to do something with each character in a string?

Here's some code that goes through each character of a string building up words, then prints them individually. You'll notice that string has the same interface as vector (str[i], str.push_back(char), str.size(), etc.).

// You'll need to include <iostream> and <string>

std::string example = "This is an example string";
std::string word;

// Notice how you can loop through a string just like a vector<char>
for(size_t i = 0; i < example.size(); ++i) {
    char c = example[i];

    // When we see whitespace, print the current word and clear it
    if(c == ' ' || c == '\t' || c == '\n') {
        // Don't print anything if we don't have a word
        if(!word.empty()) {
            std::cout << word << std::endl;
            word.clear();
        }
    } else {
        // Append the current character to the end of the string
        word += c; // or word.push_back(c)
    }
}
// In case the line doesn't end with whitespace
if(!word.empty()) {
    std::cout << word << std::endl;
}

The std::basic_string (alias for std::string) reference is probably useful.

share|improve this answer
    
This helps a lot! I'll try to use this for my program. Thank you so much. –  Sam Apr 22 '13 at 23:21
    
I tried messing around with it, but to no avail. Can you give me another pointer (no programming pun intended) in the right direction? I posted an edit in the original post of the updated code. –  Sam Apr 23 '13 at 3:12

You can use a vector data structure to hold the book class. vector records;

share|improve this answer

(I highly recommend to use a vector (or a list) for that because it will avoid the double reading of the file because you wouldn't need to know the number of line at all.)

To parse a line that has a fixed number of field, it easy in principle:

int counter = 0;
string myString;


while(!myFile.eof())
{
    getline(myFile, myString);
    counter++;
}
counter --;

//Clear the error state flag
myFile.clear()

//Return to the beginning of the file:
myFile.seekg(ios_base::beg);


const int fieldCount = 5;
string field[fieldCount ];


string buffer= "";
char c = '\0';
for( int i = 0; i < counter; ++i ) {
    for( int j = 0; j < fieldCount; ++j ) {
        myFile.ignore(); //Ignore the first '"'
        //Read each character up to the second '"'
        while( myFile.good() && (c = myfile.get()) != '"' ) {
            buffer += c;
        }
        field[j] = buffer;
        buffer = "";
        if( j != fieldCount - 1 ) {
            myFile.ignore(); //Ignore the first ','
        }
    }

    //Use the fields here.

}

I didn't test this code, I know there a lack of error-testing, but It shows a way to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
You can also add a field-specific way to parse it with a swith(j) within the second for-loop, this way you could parse a int (i.e. int x; myFile >> x;) instead of a string. –  Sharpie Apr 23 '13 at 1:03

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