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Why does Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory() return internal storage (storage/sdcard0/)? In my case, sdcard0 is local, sdcard1 external... so on.

Also:

I've been coding to get the correct external mounted SDCard location without any luck.

Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory().getAbsolutePath();

will return local storage.

I am recursively sweeping the file system for a specific type of files, yet if I don't hardcode

String rootPath = File.separator+"storage";

then I would get all that I need recursively.

Any help will be extremely appreciated.

The goal is to get all root of all storage locations (I don't think there's an environmental variable for that).

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What device are you using? –  MCeley Apr 23 '13 at 0:08
    
xt907 Motorola Razr M –  Fer Apr 23 '13 at 15:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, that is correct. Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory().getAbsolutePath() will return you a mount point as per the vendor decision on what it should be. Most OEM's nowadays point it to an internal mount point like sdcard0 or /emulated/0/.

But the root mount point will always originate from /mnt. So if you want to see what is mounted apart from the usual, start scanning from here.

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Hello Royston, thanks for your answer. My final question is: is it safe to assume /mnt will ALWAYS be the root mounting point for all storage devices? If I hardcode it as my root, will it work in other devices? Thank you again. Fernando. –  Fer Apr 23 '13 at 12:44
    
Yes it will. It is the Linux filesystem mount point and it will guarantee that it will work from 4.2.2 and below. for next releases if Android decides to change something, then we will need to see. –  Royston Pinto Apr 23 '13 at 16:57

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