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I have an assignment that requires me to create a "Heap" class that allocates and deallocates memory. I believe that my code works and the solution builds and runs properly but I want to make sure that I am not getting any memory leaks. I also need to add some code that checks if the desired amount to be allocated to the heap is even available...if someone were to allocate a very large amount. How is it possible to check if the memory allocated on the heap is available or NULL if there is not enough memory. Here is my code so far:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Heap{
public:

double* allocateMemory(int memorySize)
{
    return new double[memorySize];
};
void deallocateMemory(double* dMemorySize)
{
    delete[] dMemorySize;
};

};

int main()
{
Heap heap;
cout << "Enter the number of double elements that you want to allocate: " << endl;
int hMemory;
const int doubleByteSize = 8;
cin >> hMemory;

double *chunkNew = heap.allocateMemory(hMemory);

cout << "The amount of space you took up on the heap is: " <<
         hMemory*doubleByteSize << " bytes" << 
     starting at address: " << "\n" << &hMemory << endl; 

heap.deallocateMemory(chunkNew);

system("pause");
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Consider using valgrind to check against memory leaks. –  Arun Apr 23 '13 at 0:41
3  
Please change 8 to sizeof(double) –  brian beuning Apr 23 '13 at 1:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's not necessary to check beforehand, just try to allocate memory and if you can't, then catch the exception. In this case it is of type bad_alloc.

#include <iostream>
#include <new>      // included for std::bad_alloc

/**
 * Allocates memory of size memorySize and returns pointer to it, or NULL if not enough memory.
 */
double* allocateMemory(int memorySize)
{
  double* tReturn = NULL;

  try
  {
     tReturn = new double[memorySize];
  }
  catch (bad_alloc& badAlloc)
  {
    cerr << "bad_alloc caught, not enough memory: " << badAlloc.what() << endl;
  }

  return tReturn;
};

Important note

Be sure to guard against double-freeing memory.

void deallocateMemory(double* dMemorySize)
{
   delete[] dMemorySize;
   dMemorySize = 0; // Make sure memory doesn't point to anything.
};

This prevents problems like the following:

double *chunkNew = heap.allocateMemory(hMemory);
heap.deallocateMemory(chunkNew);
heap.deallocateMemory(chunkNew); // chunkNew has been freed twice!
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for the help! –  Nick Apr 23 '13 at 0:42
    
Glad to help. Also, I updated the answer since you commented...there is an important note. –  Colonel Panic Apr 23 '13 at 0:50
1  
Actually... it is not necessary to check against NULL before deleting, see stackoverflow.com/questions/615355/… –  Arun Apr 23 '13 at 1:22
1  
My mistake, I meant to guard against a different problem: double-freeing. Answer has been edited. –  Colonel Panic Apr 23 '13 at 1:42

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