Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I always thought that an if statement essentially compared it's argument similar to == true. However the following experiment in Firebug confirmed my worst fears—after writing Javascript for 15 years I still have no clue WTF is going on:

>>> " " == true
false
>>> if(" ") console.log("wtf")
wtf

My worldview is in shambles here. I could run some experiments to learn more, but even then I would be losing sleep for fear of browser quirks. Is this in a spec somewhere? Is it consistent cross-browser? Will I ever master javascript?

share|improve this question
    
bizarre, I'm curious to see the answers –  theraccoonbear Oct 23 '09 at 21:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

"If the two operands are not of the same type, JavaScript converts the operands then applies strict comparison. If either operand is a number or a boolean, the operands are converted to numbers; if either operand is a string, the other one is converted to a string."

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Core%5FJavaScript%5F1.5%5FReference/Operators/Comparison%5FOperators

So the first one does:

Number(" ")==Number(true)

While the second one is evaluated like this:

if(Boolean(" ")==true) console.log("wtf")
share|improve this answer
    
This is the most sensible explanation. The if statement casts to Boolean. Bonus points if anyone can find a spec for this behavior. –  gtd Oct 23 '09 at 21:46
1  
Well, the Mozilla docs have the following to say regarding the conversion taking place in the if statement: "Any value that is not undefined, null, 0, NaN, or the empty string (""), and any object, including a Boolean object whose value is false, evaluates to true when passed to a conditional statement." –  kloffy Oct 23 '09 at 21:58
    
And this concerning the conversion using Boolean(value): "If value is omitted or is 0, -0, null, false, NaN, undefined, or the empty string (""), the object has an initial value of false." –  kloffy Oct 23 '09 at 21:58
2  
A JS Ninja friend of mine just IMed me this spec: bclary.com/2004/11/07/#a-11.9.3 –  Bart Oct 23 '09 at 22:00
    
WOW +1 nice find –  DVK Oct 24 '09 at 16:38

I am guessing that it is the first part that is a problem, not the second.

It probably does some weird casting (most likely, true is cast to a string instead of " " being cast to a boolean value.

What does FireBug return for Boolean(" ") ?

share|improve this answer
    
My first reaction was this, I think you're right. –  Jonas Oct 23 '09 at 21:31
    
Well, holy wars have been perpetuated merely by the definition of truthiness in programming languages, but in javascript I just assumed that since == does casting and === is an exact match, == true would be the natural definition of truthiness. –  gtd Oct 23 '09 at 21:32
    
Boolean(" ") => true Boolean("") => false –  gtd Oct 23 '09 at 21:37
    
So, the answer is probably that the "==" operator does backwards casting (true => string "true") and then comparison fails. Kille me if I can find ANY reference that specifies just what the casting rules for "==" are though –  DVK Oct 23 '09 at 21:42
    
Check out the next two answers :) –  gtd Oct 23 '09 at 21:45

JavaScript can be quirky with things like this. Note that JavaScript has == but also ===. I would have thought that

" " == true

would be true, but

" " === true

would be false. The === operator doesn't do conversions; it checks if the value and the type on both sides of the operator are the same. The == does convert 'truthy' values to true and 'falsy' values to false.

This might be the answer - from JavaScript Comparison Operators (Mozilla documentation):

Equal (==)

If the two operands are not of the same type, JavaScript converts the operands then applies strict comparison. If either operand is a number or a boolean, the operands are converted to numbers; if either operand is a string, the other one is converted to a string

Highly recommended: Douglas Crockford on JavaScript.

share|improve this answer
    
Good link, I had Javascript: The Good Parts, but I don't know where it ran off to. –  gtd Oct 23 '09 at 21:34

Answer: aTruthyValue and true are not the same.

The semantic of the if statement is easy:

if(aTruthyValue) {
  doThis
} else {
  doThat
}

Now it's just the definition of what a truthy value is. A truthy value is, unfortunately, not something that is simply "== true" or "=== true".

ECMA-262 1.5 Setion 9.2 explains what values are truthy and which are not.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the most direct answer, as well as a link to the actual spec! –  Daniel Pryden Oct 23 '09 at 22:08

I recommend using === whenever possible, if only to avoid having existential crises.

share|improve this answer
    
This is pure silly. String.prototype.f = function () { return this }; "foo".f() === "foo" // what is the result? Identity is identity. It is a special case, not the normal case. –  user166390 Oct 23 '09 at 21:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.