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I followed this method from my other post [distance between a point and a curve[(find the distance between a point and a curve python) but something is wrong. The values aren't accurate.

I plotted this same trajectory in Mathematica and checked a few distances and I have found distances as low as 18000 where python is returning a minimum of 209000.

What is going wrong in the code at the bottom?

EDIT There was an error in this code everything checks out now. Thanks.

import numpy as np
from scipy.integrate import odeint
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D

me = 5.974 * 10 ** (24)  #  mass of the earth                                     
mm = 7.348 * 10 ** (22)  #  mass of the moon                                      
G = 6.67259 * 10 ** (-20)  #  gravitational parameter                             
re = 6378.0  #  radius of the earth in km                                         
rm = 1737.0  #  radius of the moon in km                                          
r12 = 384400.0  #  distance between the CoM of the earth and moon                 
M = me + mm

pi1 = me / M
pi2 = mm / M
mue = 398600.0  #  gravitational parameter of earth km^3/sec^2                    
mum = G * mm  #  grav param of the moon                                           
mu = mue + mum
omega = np.sqrt(mu / r12 ** 3)
nu = -129.21 * np.pi / 180  #  true anomaly angle in radian                       

x = 327156.0 - 4671
#  x location where the moon's SOI effects the spacecraft with the offset of the  
#  Earth not being at (0,0) in the Earth-Moon system                              
y = 33050.0   #  y location                                                       

vbo = 10.85  #  velocity at burnout                                               

gamma = 0 * np.pi / 180  #  angle in radians of the flight path                   

vx = vbo * (np.sin(gamma) * np.cos(nu) - np.cos(gamma) * np.sin(nu))
#  velocity of the bo in the x direction                                          
vy = vbo * (np.sin(gamma) * np.sin(nu) + np.cos(gamma) * np.cos(nu))
#  velocity of the bo in the y direction                                          

xrel = (re + 300.0) * np.cos(nu) - pi2 * r12
#  spacecraft x location relative to the earth         
yrel = (re + 300.0) * np.sin(nu)

#  r0 = [xrel, yrel, 0]                                                           
#  v0 = [vx, vy, 0]                                                               
u0 = [xrel, yrel, 0, vx, vy, 0]


def deriv(u, dt):
    n1 = -((mue * (u[0] + pi2 * r12) / np.sqrt((u[0] + pi2 * r12) ** 2
                                               + u[1] ** 2) ** 3)
        - (mum * (u[0] - pi1 * r12) / np.sqrt((u[0] - pi1 * r12) ** 2
                                              + u[1] ** 2) ** 3))
    n2 = -((mue * u[1] / np.sqrt((u[0] + pi2 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3)
        - (mum * u[1] / np.sqrt((u[0] - pi1 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3))
    return [u[3],  #  dotu[0] = u[3]                                              
            u[4],  #  dotu[1] = u[4]                                              
            u[5],  #  dotu[2] = u[5]                                              
            2 * omega * u[5] + omega ** 2 * u[0] + n1,  #  dotu[3] = that         
            omega ** 2 * u[1] - 2 * omega * u[4] + n2,  #  dotu[4] = that         
            0]  #  dotu[5] = 0                                                    


dt = np.arange(0.0, 320000.0, 1)  #  200000 secs to run the simulation            
u = odeint(deriv, u0, dt)
x, y, z, x2, y2, z2 = u.T

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')
ax.plot(x, y, z)
plt.show()


my_x, my_y, my_z = (384400,0,0)

delta_x = x - my_x
delta_y = y - my_y
delta_z = z - my_z
distance = np.array([np.sqrt(delta_x ** 2 + delta_y ** 2 +
           delta_z ** 2)])

print(distance.min())
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closed as too localized by JBernardo, plaes, Roman C, ShadowScripter, askewchan May 1 '13 at 16:37

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I tried running your code and it hung towards the end because my_x, my_y, and my_z are not defined. What should those arrays be? –  spencerlyon2 Apr 23 '13 at 2:27
    
@spencerlyon2 my apologies my_x, my_y, my_z = (384400,0,0) –  dustin Apr 23 '13 at 2:29
1  
Care to elaborate more on where your error was and/or just delete the question? –  Nick T Apr 23 '13 at 17:23
    
@NickT what is changed is in the post if you want to see –  dustin Apr 23 '13 at 18:19
    
If you answered your own question, restore your code to it's "broken" state in the question above, then fill out an answer below with what you did. –  Nick T Apr 23 '13 at 19:52
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Corrected code

import numpy as np
from scipy.integrate import odeint
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D

me = 5.974 * 10 ** (24)  #  mass of the earth                                     
mm = 7.348 * 10 ** (22)  #  mass of the moon                                      
G = 6.67259 * 10 ** (-20)  #  gravitational parameter                             
re = 6378.0  #  radius of the earth in km                                         
rm = 1737.0  #  radius of the moon in km                                          
r12 = 384400.0  #  distance between the CoM of the earth and moon                 
M = me + mm

pi1 = me / M
pi2 = mm / M
mue = 398600.0  #  gravitational parameter of earth km^3/sec^2                    
mum = G * mm  #  grav param of the moon                                           
mu = mue + mum
omega = np.sqrt(mu / r12 ** 3)
nu = -129.21 * np.pi / 180  #  true anomaly angle in radian                       

x = 327156.0 - 4671
#  x location where the moon's SOI effects the spacecraft with the offset of the  
#  Earth not being at (0,0) in the Earth-Moon system                              
y = 33050.0   #  y location                                                       

vbo = 10.85  #  velocity at burnout                                               

gamma = 0 * np.pi / 180  #  angle in radians of the flight path                   

vx = vbo * (np.sin(gamma) * np.cos(nu) - np.cos(gamma) * np.sin(nu))
#  velocity of the bo in the x direction                                          
vy = vbo * (np.sin(gamma) * np.sin(nu) + np.cos(gamma) * np.cos(nu))
#  velocity of the bo in the y direction                                          

xrel = (re + 300.0) * np.cos(nu) - pi2 * r12
#  spacecraft x location relative to the earth         
yrel = (re + 300.0) * np.sin(nu)

#  r0 = [xrel, yrel, 0]                                                           
#  v0 = [vx, vy, 0]                                                               
u0 = [xrel, yrel, 0, vx, vy, 0]


def deriv(u, dt):
    n1 = -((mue * (u[0] + pi2 * r12) / np.sqrt((u[0] + pi2 * r12) ** 2
                                               + u[1] ** 2) ** 3)
        - (mum * (u[0] - pi1 * r12) / np.sqrt((u[0] - pi1 * r12) ** 2
                                              + u[1] ** 2) ** 3))
    n2 = -((mue * u[1] / np.sqrt((u[0] + pi2 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3)
        - (mum * u[1] / np.sqrt((u[0] - pi1 * r12) ** 2 + u[1] ** 2) ** 3))
    return [u[3],  #  dotu[0] = u[3]                                              
            u[4],  #  dotu[1] = u[4]                                              
            u[5],  #  dotu[2] = u[5]                                              
            2 * omega * u[4] + omega ** 2 * u[0] + n1,  #  dotu[3] = that         
            omega ** 2 * u[1] - 2 * omega * u[3] + n2,  #  dotu[4] = that         
            0]  #  dotu[5] = 0       


dt = np.arange(0.0, 320000.0, 1)  #  200000 secs to run the simulation            
u = odeint(deriv, u0, dt)
x, y, z, x2, y2, z2 = u.T

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')
ax.plot(x, y, z)
plt.show()


my_x, my_y, my_z = (384400,0,0)

delta_x = x - my_x
delta_y = y - my_y
delta_z = z - my_z
distance = np.array([np.sqrt(delta_x ** 2 + delta_y ** 2 +
           delta_z ** 2)])

print(distance.min())
share|improve this answer
    
You should mark this as the accepted answer. –  askewchan Apr 25 '13 at 1:59
    
@askewchan I can't for another 13mins. –  dustin Apr 25 '13 at 2:01
    
haha OK. Just said "yesterday" so I thought enough time had passed :) –  askewchan Apr 25 '13 at 2:03
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