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I've been going around the block a couple of times on this, so I'm taking a fresh approach. I would like to figure out if it possible to have a single entity that is on the many-side of multiple 0-to-many relationships. This is what I'm trying to do:

A Client has 0-to-many Phones

public class Client
{
  [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
  public int ClientId { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }

  public virtual ICollection<Phone> Phones { get; set; }
}

A Business has 0-to-many Phones

public class Business
{
  [Key]
  [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
  public int BusinessId { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }

  public virtual ICollection<Phone> Phones { get; set; }
}

And here is Phones:

public class Phone
{
  [Key]
  [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
  public int PhoneId { get; set; }

  public string Number { get; set; }
}

Of course, the problem with the Phones property in Business/Client is that this creates FK's in Phone to both Client and Business, which clutters-up Phones.

So, I saw another poster try creating a manual join table, but it seemed to be geared to the many-side participating in one relationship:

public class ClientPhone
{
  public int ClientID { get; set; }
  public int PhoneID { get; set; }

  public virtual Client Client { get; set; } // One Client
  public virtual Phone Phone { get; set; } // One Phone
} 

Should I split Phone up into ClientPhones and BusinessPhones 'normal' entities using traditional 0-to-many relationships. If someone could give me some advice on the cleanest way to to model this, it would be very appreciated.

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you can model this using table per hierarchy method ,

public class Client
{
  [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
  public int ClientId { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }

  public virtual ICollection<ClientPhone> Phones { get; set; }
}


public class Business
{
  [Key]
  [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
  public int BusinessId { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }

  public virtual ICollection<BusinesPhone> Phones { get; set; }
}


public class Phone
{
  [Key]
  [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
  public int PhoneId { get; set; }

  public string Number { get; set; }
}

public class BusinesPhone:Phone
{

}

public class ClientPhone:Phone
{

}

This will create one table for both client and business phone with a discriminator column. Then you can easily separate client and business phones.

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Wow, was I over thinking this! I assume I add the derived classes to the DBContext? –  cardinalPilot Apr 24 '13 at 13:53
    
Yes that's correct –  Jayantha Lal Sirisena Apr 24 '13 at 14:29
    
Additional thought - you refer to being able to easily separate the client and business phones. How can you do that when the discriminator column is internal and not accessible from the POCO's? If you are not able to answer, I'll post a new question. –  cardinalPilot Apr 30 '13 at 20:18
    
I think the best way is to keep a enum called PhoneType in the phone table without any other hierarchy of classes since those classes don't have any special responsibilities attached to them. –  Jayantha Lal Sirisena May 1 '13 at 2:05

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